Virginia creeper


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Virginia creeper

n.
A North American climbing vine (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) having palmately compound leaves with five leaflets and bluish-black berries. Also called woodbine.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Virginia creeper

n
1. (Plants) Also called (US): American ivy or woodbine a vitaceous woody vine, Parthenocissus quinquefolia, of North America, having tendrils with adhesive tips, bluish-black berry-like fruits, and compound leaves that turn red in autumn: widely planted for ornament
2. (Plants) Also called: Japanese ivy a similar related plant, Parthenocissus tricuspidata, of SE Asia, having trilobed leaves and purple berries. US name: Boston ivy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Virgin′ia creep′er


n.
a North American climbing plant, Parthenocissus quinquefolia, of the grape family, having palmate leaves, usu. with five leaflets, and bluish black berries.
[1660–70, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Virginia creeper - common North American vine with compound leaves and bluish-black berrylike fruitVirginia creeper - common North American vine with compound leaves and bluish-black berrylike fruit
vine - a plant with a weak stem that derives support from climbing, twining, or creeping along a surface
genus Parthenocissus, Parthenocissus - woody vines having disklike tips on the tendrils
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Virginia creeper

nwilder Wein, Jungfernrebe f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Virginia creeper

[vəˌdʒɪnjəˈkriːpəʳ] nvite f del Canada
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Then she swayed, lost her balance, stumbled, staggered, and fell, sliding down over the sun-baked roof and crashing off it through the tangle of Virginia creeper beneath-- all before the dismayed circle below could give a simultaneous, terrified shriek.
Nevertheless, when Diana and the other girls had rushed frantically around the house--except Ruby Gillis, who remained as if rooted to the ground and went into hysterics--they found Anne lying all white and limp among the wreck and ruin of the Virginia creeper.
The front door walk is bordered with quahog clam-shells -- `cow-hawks,' Janet calls them; there is Virginia Creeper over the porch and moss on the roof.
The south front is one-storied, a long series of rooms opening one into the other, and the walls are covered with virginia creeper. There is a little verandah in the middle, leading by a flight of rickety wooden steps down into what seems to have been the only spot in the whole place that was ever cared for.
It was a broad low stucco house, with a Virginia creeper growing over it.
The low sun is fiery and yet cold behind the monastery ruin, and the Virginia creeper on the Cathedral wall has showered half its deep-red leaves down on the pavement.
It stood immediately behind a lamppost, and I could not but notice that a love-lock of Virginia creeper was trailing almost to the step, and that the bow-window on the ground floor was closely shuttered.
Using a knife, trim back new growth of Virginia creeper and ivy on house walls so it does not get on to paint work, invade guttering or sneak under tiles.
I was asked recently whether a Virginia creeper would add character to the outside walls of a new build or whether planting it could cause damage to the brickwork etc.
> The Virginia creeper covering the Tu Hwnt i'r Bont Tearooms, Llanwrst THE change of the seasons has arrived as the leaves covering a picturesque tearoom have begun to take on their autumnal shades.
"Declaration" could easily have been named "Listening." While there's much in America to tear down and replace, there's also something to be said for strategies like those of the Virginia creeper. None dare call this vine, native to the Southeast, invasive, even as it slowly but surely transforms everything it touches.

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