minimally invasive

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minimally invasive

or

minimal invasive

adj
(Surgery) (of surgery) involving as little incision into the body as possible, through the use of techniques such as keyhole surgery and laser treatment
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Virtopsy, a new imaging horizon in forensic pathology: Virtual autopsy by postmortem multislice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): A feasibility study.
The Morgue traces the history of pathology from a medieval Chinese text believed to be the first forensic guide to today's "Virtopsy" machines which use MRI and 3D scans and MSCT (multi-slice computed tomography) to examine a body without cutting it open.
Sophisticated CT scanning and MRI technology have contributed to the development of the 'virtopsy', (10) whereby invasive techniques or dissection are replaced by sophisticated postmortem imaging techniques.
They consider quality assurance in quantifiable methods applied in the laboratory, in the emerging disciplines of personalized therapy and virtopsy, and in professional education at the graduate and post-graduate levels.
Imaging of the body, wrapped in an artifact-free body bag (Rudolph Egli AG, Bern, Switzerland), using multislice CT (MSCT), subject to Virtopsy standard protocol, (2,6,7) was performed before conventional autopsy and approximately 9 hours after death.
The virtopsy approach; 3D optical and radiological scanning and reconstruction in forensic medicine.
The virtual autopsy (Virtopsy) is an imaging tool now promoted to aid in determining cause of death, wound reconstruction and whether an injury was received before or after death.
This edition has new material on coping with the courts, modern cross-sectional imaging in anthropology, new approaches to radiology in mass casualty situations, the use of virtual imaging and virtopsy, the use of x-rays to detect body packing for smuggling and as security against hazards and terrorism, and technological advances and new modalities, including radiology in institutions, mobile units, the field, and investigation of antiques and mummies.
We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Virtopsy Foundation, Bern, Switzerland.