visor

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vi·sor

also vi·zor  (vī′zər)
n.
1. A piece projecting from the front of a cap or headband to shade or protect the eyes.
2. A transparent, often tinted piece on the front of a safety helmet, designed to protect the face and eyes and usually capable of being raised and lowered.
3. A fixed or movable shield against glare attached above the windshield of an automotive vehicle.
4. The front piece of the helmet of a suit of armor, designed to protect the face and eyes while allowing the wearer to see through a narrow opening.
5. A means of concealment or disguise; a mask.
tr.v. vi·sored, vi·sor·ing, vi·sors also vi·zored or vi·zor·ing or vi·zors
To provide or protect with a visor.

[Alteration of Middle English viser, from Anglo-Norman, from vis, face, from Latin vīsus, appearance; see visage.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

visor

(ˈvaɪzə) or

vizor

n
1. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) a transparent flap on a helmet that can be pulled down to protect the face
2. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) a piece of armour fixed or hinged to the helmet to protect the face and with slits for the eyes
3. (Clothing & Fashion) another name for peak6
4. (Automotive Engineering) a small movable screen used as protection against glare from the sun, esp one attached above the windscreen of a motor vehicle
5. archaic or literary a mask or any other means of disguise or concealment
vb
(tr) to cover, provide, or protect with a visor; shield
[C14: from Anglo-French viser, from Old French visiere, from vis face; see visage]
ˈvisored, ˈvizored adj
ˈvisorless, ˈvizorless adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

vi•sor

or vi•zor

(ˈvaɪ zər)

n.
1. the projecting front brim of a cap.
2. a flap, mounted on the inside of an automobile, used to shield one's eyes from glare.
3. the front piece on a medieval helmet, often being movable and having slits for vision.
4. a means of concealment; disguise.
v.t.
5. to protect or mask with a visor; shield.
[1250–1300; Middle English viser < Anglo-French (compare Old French visiere) =vis face (see visage) + -er -er2]
vi′sored, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

visor


Past participle: visored
Gerund: visoring

Imperative
visor
visor
Present
I visor
you visor
he/she/it visors
we visor
you visor
they visor
Preterite
I visored
you visored
he/she/it visored
we visored
you visored
they visored
Present Continuous
I am visoring
you are visoring
he/she/it is visoring
we are visoring
you are visoring
they are visoring
Present Perfect
I have visored
you have visored
he/she/it has visored
we have visored
you have visored
they have visored
Past Continuous
I was visoring
you were visoring
he/she/it was visoring
we were visoring
you were visoring
they were visoring
Past Perfect
I had visored
you had visored
he/she/it had visored
we had visored
you had visored
they had visored
Future
I will visor
you will visor
he/she/it will visor
we will visor
you will visor
they will visor
Future Perfect
I will have visored
you will have visored
he/she/it will have visored
we will have visored
you will have visored
they will have visored
Future Continuous
I will be visoring
you will be visoring
he/she/it will be visoring
we will be visoring
you will be visoring
they will be visoring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been visoring
you have been visoring
he/she/it has been visoring
we have been visoring
you have been visoring
they have been visoring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been visoring
you will have been visoring
he/she/it will have been visoring
we will have been visoring
you will have been visoring
they will have been visoring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been visoring
you had been visoring
he/she/it had been visoring
we had been visoring
you had been visoring
they had been visoring
Conditional
I would visor
you would visor
he/she/it would visor
we would visor
you would visor
they would visor
Past Conditional
I would have visored
you would have visored
he/she/it would have visored
we would have visored
you would have visored
they would have visored
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.visor - a piece of armor plate (with eye slits) fixed or hinged to a medieval helmet to protect the facevisor - a piece of armor plate (with eye slits) fixed or hinged to a medieval helmet to protect the face
armor plate, armor plating, armour plate, plate armor, plate armour - specially hardened steel plate used to protect fortifications or vehicles from enemy fire
helmet - armor plate that protects the head
2.visor - a brim that projects to the front to shade the eyesvisor - a brim that projects to the front to shade the eyes; "he pulled down the bill of his cap and trudged ahead"
baseball cap, golf cap, jockey cap - a cap with a bill
brim - a circular projection that sticks outward from the crown of a hat
kepi, peaked cap, service cap, yachting cap - a cap with a flat circular top and a visor
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

visor

noun
The projecting rim on the front of a cap:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
kšilt
lippavisiiri
napellenző

visor

[ˈvaɪzəʳ] Nvisera f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

visor

[ˈvaɪzər] nvisière f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

visor

n (on helmet) → Visier nt; (on cap) → Schirm m; (Aut) → Blende f; sun visorSchild m, → Schirm m; (Aut) → Sonnenblende f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

visor

[ˈvaɪzəʳ] n (on helmet) → visiera (Aut) → aletta parasole
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
'but you'll find that as you get vider, you'll get viser. Vidth and visdom, Sammy, alvays grows together.'
, national and viser, l Dr Rachael Jordan, the Church of England's mission evangelism adviser, said: "Institutional and cultural faith, a belonging to the national church because you are part of this country, has declined.
Foreign capital requires stability, said economic observer Viser Ademi.
The board of directors and officers of the Mississippi Biomass & Renewable Energy Council (MBREC) selected Rusty Ponder, Energy Management Coordinator for the Rankin County School District, to receive the Third Annual Sustainable Energy Visionary Leader (VISER) Award in recognition of his efforts to save energy in Rankin County Schools and promote STEM education in Mississippi through the use of renewable energy.
rappellent qu'au final, la CEFC doit viser a susciter une relation plus etroite avec les parents afin que ceux-ci soient davantage outilles dans l'exercice de leur role a la maison et a l'ecole.
That of another Republican contender, Carly Fiorina, is in the range of $71 million, as Matt Viser of The Boston Globe reported in a recent story that also mentioned the median household net worth in the United States right now: $81,200.
Studier viser til kroppslige plager og ubehag, samt endret seksualliv (25), stress i forhold til infertilitet (6, 7), kreftrelatert fatigue (2, 8-10) og angst og bekymring for tilbakefall, eller ny kreft (11-13).
The site is edited by Matt Viser, the paper's political and White House reporter, who sees it as a side job.