Vishnu

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Vish·nu

 (vĭsh′no͞o)
n. Hinduism
One of the principal Hindu deities, worshiped as the protector and preserver of worlds. Vishnu is often conceived as a member of the trimurti along with Brahma and Shiva.

[Sanskrit Viṣṇuḥ.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Vishnu

(ˈvɪʃnuː)
n
(Hinduism) Hinduism the Pervader or Sustainer: originally a solar deity occupying a secondary place in the Hindu pantheon; later one of the three chief gods, the second member of the Trimurti; and, later still, the saviour appearing in many incarnations
[C17: from Sanskrit Viṣṇu, literally: the one who works everywhere]
ˈVishnuˌism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Vish•nu

(ˈvɪʃ nu)

n.
“the Preserver,” the second member of the Hindu Trimurti, along with Brahma the Creator and Shiva the Destroyer, believed to have descended from heaven to earth in several incarnations.
[< Skt viṣṇu]
Vish′nu•ism, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Vishnu - the sustainerVishnu - the sustainer; a Hindu divinity worshipped as the preserver of worlds
Trimurti - the triad of divinities of later Hinduism
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
He is currently studying the history of Vishnuite traditions in Sanskrit, the circumstances of textual transmission in classical India and the writings of Jesuit missionaries of the eighteenth century in Indian languages.
Narada, named in the second line just quoted, is a mythical character: a rishi of Vedic times, considered as one of the ten prajapati (protectors of life) of the Purana, son of Brahma in the Mahabharata, etc., he is here mentioned as the supposed author of a samhita (collection of religious texts) of the Vishnuite sect of Vallabha, the Naradapancaratra, chiefly devoted to the worship of Krishna: see Renou and Filliozat 1947-1953: I, 647-651 ([sections] 1317-1323).