Visigoths

(redirected from Visigothic Kingdom)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

Visigoths

A Gothic people who spread from Spain through Gaul then drove south to Rome, which they sacked in AD 410.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 'chronicle' revolves around a reinterpretation of the prophecy of Ezekiel with the purpose of predicting the precise end of Islamic domination in Hispania and the restoration of the Visigothic kingdom, by 11 November 884.
Morocco was indeed the point of entry of Arabs to Spain and Portugal when, in 719, the Moslems-with a significant Berber contingent-conquered Toledo, capital of what had been the Visigothic kingdom of Hispania (itself a previous part of the Roman empire), and transformed it into an important outpost of Islam collectively known as al-Andalous (the origin of Andalusia).
Estaba floreciendo una cultura naciente con vinculaciones estrechas con el imperio bizantino donde se conservo la cultura clasica que se difundio en el reino visigodo, <<the Visigothic kingdom had functioned as a preserver of classical culture>> (p.
This demonstrates the effects of chaos on the Visigothic kingdom and supports the Umayyad promotion of order as essential to civilization (Safran 129).
(10) Imagining the reconquista and the expulsion of Conversos and Moriscos as the means to reinstitute the Christian order of the medieval Visigothic kingdom, those plays often conflate Gothic and Castilian identities.
Fernandez Morera provides an array of historical facts and insightful arguments that demonstrate how the influence went in the other direction: it was the Romanized Visigothic kingdom, defeated and obliterated by Islamic invaders, which furnished the inspiration and the elements of the cultural achievements of the latter--including both the materials and the key architectural features of the fiimous mosque in Cordoba.
This paradox, initiated with the Muslim invasion of the Iberian Peninsula in 711, endorsed their subsequent dominance over the former Christian Visigothic kingdom. Unlike Maria Rosa Menocal's 2002 Ornament of the World depiction of al-Andalus as the reverential "culture of tolerance," Lucy K.
King, Law and Society in the Visigothic Kingdom (Cambridge, 1972), 238-40.