Visigoths


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Related to Visigoths: Huns, Vandals

Visigoths

A Gothic people who spread from Spain through Gaul then drove south to Rome, which they sacked in AD 410.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
| 410: Rome fell to a western group of the tribes known as the Visigoths. | 1793: France introduced the first national conscription, claiming all unmarried men aged 18 to 25.
What were previously known as the natives of Hispaniola were scattered descendants of the Visigoths, the barbarians at the gates of the dying Roman Empire.
The church from which they were stolen is believed to date from the era of the Visigoths, with experts dating it between the seventh and eleventh centuries.
They adore decorating homes and environs with colourful lights that lend a fuzz of warmth to the chill of December nights, and cook enough to feed an army of ravenous Visigoths. Some revellers even end up in hospital from having over eaten.
This story began in a charming French city nicknamed La Ville Rose, the one with pinkish terracotta bricks, cobblestone streets, and small French cafes; the one which the Visigoths conquered during the Dark Ages; the one where old slaughterhouses have long been forgotten, their smears of blood now covered with art, and the one where the 16th century arched bridge Pont Neuf glistens under the setting sun.
A Plantagenets B Goths C Visigoths D Carolingians 5.
Jorg Drauschke offers a very careful and trustworthy summary in "The Development of Diplomatic Contacts and Exchange between the Byzantine Empire and the Frankish kingdoms until the Early Eighth Century." Jose Cristobal Carvajal Lopez, Julio Miguel Roman Punzon, Miguel Jimenez Puertas, and Javier Martinez Jimenez in "When the East Came to the West: The Seventh Century in the Vega of Granada (South-East Spain): Visigoths, Byzantines and Muslims," offer insights on the border between Byzantines and Visigoths in southern Spain.
The Visigoths in Gaul and Iberia (Update): A Supplemental Bibliography, 2013-2015
According to Ibn al-Qutiya's text, the last king of the Visigoths is Witiza.
In chapter 2, "The Effects of Jihad: The Destruction of a Nascent Civilization," he shows that both written and archeological evidence reveals that the Visigoths, generally disdained by contemporary advocates of Islamic superiority, had begun to develop a sophisticated culture that was simply eradicated by the Muslim conquest.
In the same vein, the Visigoths were a people which encountered so deep an immersion into the Mediterranean world that they in fact lost their barbarian status (BEATUS RHENANUS 2008, p.
In "The Graduation Speech" from the book Conscientious Objections: Stirring Up Trouble about Language, Technology, and Education, Neil Postman (1988) narrates a dichotomy between two cultures, the Athenians and the Visigoths. The dialectical opposition between Athenians and Visigoths provides an interesting characterization of aesthetic gentility versus vulgar Philistinism.