blindness

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blind

 (blīnd)
adj. blind·er, blind·est
1.
a. Sightless.
b. Having a maximal visual acuity of the better eye, after correction by refractive lenses, of one-tenth normal vision or less (20/200 or less on the Snellen test).
c. Of, relating to, or for sightless persons.
2.
a. Performed or made without the benefit of background information that might prejudice the outcome or result: blind taste tests used in marketing studies.
b. Performed without preparation, experience, or knowledge: a blind stab at answering the question.
c. Performed by instruments and without the use of sight: blind navigation.
3. Unable or unwilling to perceive or understand: blind to a lover's faults.
4. Not based on reason or evidence; unquestioning: put blind faith in their leaders.
5. Slang Drunk.
6. Lacking reason or purpose: blind fate; blind choice.
7.
a. Difficult to comprehend or see; illegible.
b. Incompletely or illegibly addressed: blind mail.
c. Hidden from sight: a blind seam.
d. Screened from the view of oncoming motorists: a blind driveway.
e. Secret or otherwise undisclosed: a blind item in a military budget.
8. Closed at one end: a blind socket; a blind passage.
9. Having no opening: a blind wall.
10. Botany Failing to produce flowers or fruits: a blind bud.
n.
1. (used with a pl. verb) Blind people considered as a group. Used with the: a radio station for reading to the blind.
2. often blinds Something, such as a window shade or a Venetian blind, that hinders vision or shuts out light.
3. A shelter for concealing hunters, photographers, or observers of wildlife.
4. Something intended to conceal the true nature, especially of an activity; a subterfuge.
5. A forced bet in poker that is placed before the cards are dealt.
adv.
1.
a. Without seeing; blindly.
b. Without the aid of visual reference: flew blind through the fog.
2. Without forethought or provision; unawares: entered into the scheme blind.
3. Without significant information, especially that might affect an outcome or result: "When you read blind, you see everything but the author" (Margaret Atwood).
4. Informal Into a stupor: drank themselves blind.
5. Used as an intensive: Thieves in the bazaar robbed us blind.
tr.v. blind·ed, blind·ing, blinds
1. To deprive of sight: was blinded in an industrial accident.
2. To dazzle: skiers temporarily blinded by sunlight on snow.
3. To deprive of perception or insight: prejudice that blinded them to the proposal's merits.
4. To withhold light from: Thick shrubs blinded our downstairs windows.

[Middle English, from Old English; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

blind′ing·ly adv.
blind′ly adv.
blind′ness n.

Blindness

See also eyes.

a lack or loss of sight. — ableptical, adj.
a condition of partial or total blindness, caused by a disease of the optie nerve. — amaurotic, adj.
obscurity of vision, occurring without any organic change in the eyes; the first stage of amaurosis. — amblyopic, adj.
blindness.
blindness.
Medicine. the condition of snow blindness.
Obsolete, the state of having defective eyesight; purblindness.
Obsolete, the process of blinding.
a disease of the eyes, in which the eyeball hardens and becomes tense, often resulting in blindness. — glaucomatous, adj.
the loss of sight in daylight. — hemeralopic, adj.
a writing frame designed for use by blind people.
the loss of sight in darkness. — nyctalopic, adj.
a device combining a selenium cell and telephone apparatus that converts light energy into sound energy, used to enable blind people to sense light through the hearing and thus read printed matter.
an instrument for writing when unable to see.
a blind spot or blind area in the field of vision.
the totality of medical knowledge concerning the causes, treatment, and prevention of blindness.
a person who devotes himself to helping the blind.
blindness. — typhlotic, adj.

Blindness

 

See Also: EYE(S); EYE EXPRESSIONS, BLANK

  1. Blind as a bat —Anon

    Attribution for this enduringly popular cliche dates back to the seventeenth century and a somewhat longer old English version from John Clarke’s Paromiologia: “Blind as a bat at noone.” Less used variants are “Blind as a beetle” and “Blind as a buzzard.”

  2. Blind as a flame of fire —Algernon Charles Swinburne
  3. Blind as a fool’s heart —Robert Browning
  4. Blind [about understanding love and hate] as a newborn child —Marguerite Duras
  5. Blind as a newt —Leigh Allison Wilson
  6. Blind as a night fog —Daniel Berrigan
  7. Blind as a stone —Anon

    This still commonly used expression dates back to the fourteenth century, even before Chaucer used it in Canterbury Tales: “Blind as is a stoon.”

  8. (Eyes staring,) blind as glass —Rose Tremain
  9. Blind as Hell —William Habbington
  10. Blind as ignorance —Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher
  11. Blind as inexperience —Victor Hugo
  12. Blind as love —Percy Bysshe Shelley
  13. Blind as maggots —Mark Helprin
  14. Blind as night —Beryl Markham
  15. (Bright and) blind as the moon in the blank mid-morning sky —F. D. Reeve
  16. Blind as the waves of the sea —Eva Gore-Booth
  17. Oblivious of … as an ant or a flea might be to the sound of the avalanche on which it rides —William Faulkner
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blindness - the state of being blind or lacking sightblindness - the state of being blind or lacking sight
legal blindness - vision that is 20/200 or worse in both eyes (20/200 vision is the ability to see at 20 feet what a normal eye can see at 200 feet)
vision defect, visual defect, visual disorder, visual impairment - impairment of the sense of sight
anopia - sightlessness (especially because of a structural defect in or the absence of an eye)
snowblindness, snow-blindness - temporary blindness caused by exposure to sunlight reflected from snow or ice
eyelessness - blindness due to loss of the eyes
figural blindness - inability to see shapes and contours

blindness

noun
The condition of not being able to see:
Translations
عَمى
slepota
blindhed
BlindheitAmaurose
sokeus
sljepilosljepoća
vakság
blinda, blindni
slepota
slepota
körlük

blindness

[ˈblaɪndnɪs] Nceguera f
blindness to the truthceguera frente a la verdad

blindness

[ˈblaɪndnɪs] ncécité f
blindness to sth (= refusal to see) → refus m de voir qchblind spot n (in car, plane)angle m mort
to have a blind spot about sth (fig)ne rien comprendre à qchblind trust n (FINANCE) organisme indépendant de gestion d'actifs

blindness

n (lit, fig)Blindheit f(to gegenüber)

blindness

[ˈblaɪndnɪs] ncecità
blindness to the realities of life → rifiuto di guardare in faccia la realtà

blind

(blaind) adjective
1. not able to see. a blind man.
2. (with to) unable to notice. She is blind to his faults.
3. hiding what is beyond. a blind corner.
4. of or for blind people. a blind school.
noun
1. (often in plural) a screen to prevent light coming through a window etc. The sunlight is too bright – pull down the blinds!
2. something intended to mislead or deceive. He did that as a blind.
verb
to make blind. He was blinded in the war.
ˈblinding adjective
1. tending to make blind. a blinding light.
2. sudden. He realized, in a blinding flash, that she was the murderer.
ˈblindly adverb
ˈblindness noun
blind alley
a situation without any way out. This is a blind alley of a job.
ˈblindfold noun
a piece of cloth etc put over the eyes to prevent someone from seeing. The kidnappers put a blindfold over the child's eyes.
verb
to put a blindfold on (some person or animal).
adjective, adverb
with the eyes covered by a cloth etc. She came blindfold into the room.
blind spot
1. any matter about which one always shows lack of understanding. She seems to have a blind spot about physics.
2. an area which is impossible or difficult to see due to an obstruction.
the blind leading the blind
one inexperienced or incompetent person telling another about something. My teaching you about politics will be a case of the blind leading the blind.

blind·ness

n. ceguera;
color ___acromatopsia, ___ al color;
night ___nictalopía, ___ nocturna;
red ______ roja;
total ___pérdida completa de la visión.

blindness

n ceguera; color — daltonismo (form), dificultad f para diferenciar ciertos colores; night — ceguera nocturna
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The organization, which caters to people with visual disabilities, will start the program at the beginning of the new school year in September.