Sackville-West

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Related to Vita Sackville-West: Harold Nicolson

Sack·ville-West

 (săk′vĭl-wĕst′), Victoria Mary Known as "Vita." 1892-1962.
British writer whose novels include The Edwardians (1930) and All Passion Spent (1931).

Sackville-West

(ˌsækvɪl ˈwɛst)
n
(Biography) Victoria (Mary), known as Vita. 1892–1962, British writer and gardener, whose works include the novel The Edwardians (1930) and the poem The Land (1931). She is also noted for the gardens at Sissinghurst Castle, Kent. Married to Harold Nicolson

Sack′ville-West′



n.
Dame Victoria Mary ( “Vita” ), 1892–1962, English poet and novelist.
References in periodicals archive ?
A PREVIOUSLY unseen work by the novelist Vita Sackville-West - written as a miniature book for Queen Mary's dolls' house - is to be published for the first time.
Perhaps the most famous of these gardens is the one at Sissinghurst Castle, home of writer and diplomat Harold Nicolson and his wife Vita Sackville-West, an excellent writer and the inspiration for the protagonist of Woolf's novel Orlando.
Minority Voices Theatre will present "Vita & Virginia," a romantic, revealing play adapted from the love letters between Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West.
Eva Green and Gemma Arterton, both straight, will star as literary lovers Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West in a UK film
Admirers of Virginia Woolf's fiction will recognize Pepita as the Spanish dancer whom Orlando marries in Orlando (1928), Woolf's unique "love-letter" to Vita Sackville-West.
Vita Sackville-West argues convincingly that the English country house is "essentially part of the country, not only in the country, but part of it, a natural growth" (8).
Titles in the Belgravia Lending Library include Mary Shelleys Frankenstein, Julian Fellowes Belgravia, Ian Flemings James Bond series, an anthology of Tennyson poetry, a stunning photography book showcasing Philip Treacys hats and biographies of politician Margaret Thatcher, poet and novelist Vita Sackville-West and actress Vivien Leigh.
Ostensibly it is a fascinating tale of seven generations of women, including Vita Sackville-West, friend and lover of Virginia Woolf and the famous houses in which they intermittently lived: Knole, the calendar house, with its 365 rooms and 52 staircases and Sissinghurst with its celebrated gardens.
When Virginia Woolf introduced the idea of Orlando (1928) to Vita Sackville-West, whose life was the basis for Orlando, she explained that Sackville-West's "excellence as a subject" arose largely from her "noble birth," adding teasingly: "(But whats [sic] 400 years of nobility, all the same?
With a large natural swimming pond and writers' retreat, it features a two-storey, oak-framed building inspired by the writing room of poet Vita Sackville-West at Sissinghurst Castle in Kent, a swimming pond edged with water-loving plants, a woodland of river birches, acacias and acers, and a garden with tumbling roses and peonies in a palette of greens, punctuated by soft pinks, lavender blues and creams, and a touch of orange.
It features a two-storey oak framed building inspired by the writing room of poet Vita Sackville-West at Sissinghurst Castle, a swimming pond edged with water-loving plants, a woodland of river birches, acacias and acers, and a garden with tumbling roses and peonies in a palette of greens, punctuated by soft pinks, lavender blues and creams, with a touch of orange.
The Sissinghurst garden was created by writer Vita Sackville-West and her husband, Harold Nicolson.