vitious

vitious

(ˈvɪʃəs)
adj
a variant spelling of vicious6, vicious7
References in classic literature ?
Yet somtimes Nations will decline so low From vertue, which is reason, that no wrong, But Justice, and some fatal curse annext Deprives them of thir outward libertie, Thir inward lost: Witness th' irreverent Son Of him who built the Ark, who for the shame Don to his Father, heard this heavie curse, SERVANT OF SERVANTS, on his vitious Race.
public State conformably govern'd to the inward vitious rule, by
thrive"--summons a similar linguistic moment: this kind of usage fell out of fashion in the eighteenth century about as quickly as it had arisen in the sixteenth, considered by Samuel Johnson "a vitious mode of speech.
free will," (26) and that "an unwarrantable act without a vitious will is no crime at all.
for one, decides that "many vitious Persons when they know not how any longer to be idle, for variety of Idlenesse goe to see Plaies" (8) As he traces the roots of English drama, Glynne Wickham finds that in early modern England the professional player was regarded by many "as living by means of fraudulent pretense instead of by honest toil," and as such, found himself the target of "sporadic outbursts of hostility grounded in envy for a way of life that seemed to offer .
Therefore when our olde men praise the Courtes of times past because there were not in them so vitious men, as some that are in oures, they doe not knowe that there were not also in them so vertuous men, as some that are in oures .
lap up vitious principles in sweet pills" (CPW 1:818).
Too many modern couples were willing "to gratify their vitious Part in the formality of a legal Appointment," he wrote, without "one Ounce of Affection, not a Grain of original, chast, and rivetted Love, the Glory of a Christian Matrimony, and the essential Happiness of Life.
In the pre-Revolution colonies, even established citizens could lose their "freeman" status if they exhibited behavior characterized as "grossly scandalouse, or notoriously vitious.
40) According to Waterhouse, Oviedo declared that Indians were "by nature slothfull and idle, vitious, malancholy, slovenly, of bad conditions, lyers, of small memory, [and] of no constancy or trust.