Vitruvius Pollio


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Vitruvius Pollio

(vɪˈtruːvɪəs ˈpɒlɪˌəʊ)
n
(Biography) Marcus (ˈmɑːkəs). 1st century bc, Roman architect, noted for his treatise De architectura, the only surviving Roman work on architectural theory and a major influence on Renaissance architects
Viˈtruvian adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Vi•tru•vi•us Pol•li•o

(vɪˈtru vi əs ˈpɒl iˌoʊ)
n.
Marcus, fl. 1st century B.C., Roman architect, engineer, and author.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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In the early chapters the architectural reflection is anchored in Vitruvius Pollio's classical discussion of architectural thought, and Rae repeatedly returns to Vitruvius's governing principles of order, proportion, symmetry, and economy.
Da Vinci himself credits 1st century BC Roman architect and engineer Marcus Vitruvius Pollio, as the first exponent of this idea, in his 13-30 BC book, Des Architectura- in the chapter Temples and the Human Body.
([dagger]) Thirty-five years ago John Timusk said I needed to read about a dead guy named Marcus Vitruvius Pollio (c.
(1.) Architecture of Marcus Vitruvius Pollio, in Ten Books, translated by Joseph Gwilt (London: Priestly and Weale, 1826), 3-4.
Marcus Vitruvius Pollio, a Roman writer, architect and engineer, active in the 1st century BC, best known as the author of the multi-volume work De Architectura (On Architecture) discloses the mathematical symmetry of the male body that gives birth to a new paradigm in design:
by Marcus Vitruvius Pollio, an engineer for Octavian, who became Emperor Augustus.
Vitruvius Pollio, M.: 1495, De architectura libri X, Venice, (in Latin).
(5) Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books of Architecture, ed.
In woods, caves, and groves, they lived on food gathered in the fields," wrote Marcus Vitruvius Pollio more than 2,000 years ago in his well-known account of classical traditions in architecture.
Vitruvius Pollio a prosaic description (Vitruvius, De architectura, 10.5.2) of the technology which the poet celebrated: Vitruvius probably wrote between 25 and 23 B.C.; the epigram ...