References in periodicals archive ?
A Alexander Tolstoy B Anton Chekhov C Vladimir Nabokov D Fyodor Sologub 3.
A Vladimir Nabokov B Anton Chekhov C Feodor Sologub D Ivan Goncharov 4.
Exploring the influence of German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) on the work of Russian-American novelist Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977), Rodgers illustrates a background of Nietzschean assumptions in Nabokov's work in order to make sense of a number of persistent problems in the latter's oeuvre, for example the nature of the relationships between art and morality and between author and reader.
The day is annually observed on April 23 to mark the anniversary of the birth or death of a range of well-known writers, including Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Maurice Druon, Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Haldor Kiljan Laxness, Manuel Mejia Vallejo, Vladimir Nabokov, Josep Pla and William Shakespeare.
It is also the date of birth or death of other prominent authors, such as Maurice Druon, Haldor K Laxness, Vladimir Nabokov, Josep Pla, and Manuel MejE[degrees]a Vallejo.
LETTERS TO V'c9RA by Vladimir Nabokov, edited and translated by Olga Voronina and Brian Boyd For more than 50 years, V`ra was a"song," a muse, a protector for her husband.
It is also the date of birth or death of other prominent authors, such as Maurice Druon, Haldor K.Laxness, Vladimir Nabokov, Josep Pla and Manuel Vallejo.
For Russian novelist Vladimir Nabokov, 'no single English word renders all the shades of toska,' a Russian term that roughly translates to sadness and melancholia.
Written through "one fortnight of wonderful excitement and sustained inspiration," Invitation to a Beheading is regarded as a novel toward which Vladimir Nabokov himself has the "greatest esteem" (Nabokov 1975: 92).
A somewhat less-known, more rarefied battle destroyed the once companionable relationship between the novelist Vladimir Nabokov and the eminent American man of letters Edmund Wilson.
Their themes are Great Expectations, Oliver Twist, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde and the author Vladimir Nabokov and his love of butterflies.
In a 1969 interview with Allene Talmey of Vogue, Vladimir Nabokov dismissed his own Nikolai Gogol, a critical biography of the nineteenth-century Russian writer as an "innocent, and rather superficial, little sketch" (Strong 156).

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