vocal folds

(redirected from Vocal chord)
Also found in: Medical.

vocal folds

pl n
(Anatomy) See vocal cords
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

vo′cal cords`



n.pl.
either of two pairs of folds of mucous membrane stretched across the larynx, the lower pair of which produces sound or voice as it is made to vibrate by the passage of air from the lungs.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
"Well, you'll take off your things and stay to tea, at least," urged Felicity, as hospitably as her strained vocal chords would admit.
With his first sight of the great cat the ape-man knew that he had heard no note of terror in that initial roar; surprise doubtless, but the vocal chords of that mighty throat never had reacted to fear.
He will make clear how a thought, originating in the brain, passes along the nerve-wires to the vocal chords, and then in wireless vibration of air to the disc of the transmitter.
He could only bristle and tear his vocal chords with his rage.
In a statement, Jess told fans that she is struggling with her voice after a vocal chord haemmorhage.
The vocal chord shock comes after an stonishing run for Adele, who broke sales ecords with her album 25 and signed a PS90million deal with Sony Music.
The British superstar left a US clinic last week after an op to deal with a vocal chord haemorrhage, and has been warned it will be months before his voice is back to full force.
They sure know how to crank it all up and when they let go it's an awesome hardcore outpouring as they let their vocal chord take the full force of their angst.
BRITISH star Adele marked her comeback after vocal chord surgery with a record six gongs at the Grammy Awards on a night overshadowed by the death of Whitney Houston.
Doctors at Madrid's Ramon and Cajal hospital decided not to remove a polyp from the 25-year-old's vocal chord during the two-hour surgery.
Those 10 variables were: (a) primary cardiac diagnosis (see Table 1), (b) type of surgical intervention (see Table 2), (c) age at surgery (days), (d) weight at surgery (kilograms), (e) duration of intubation postoperatively (days), (f) duration of stay in the critical care unit postoperatively (days), (g) evidence of vocal chord injury (yes/no) (by direct visualization of the chords by an ENT specialist), (h) duration of circulatory arrest (minutes), (i) evidence of diaphragm injury (yes/no), and (j) duration of oral feeding preoperatively (days).
'I think it was too damaged.' Dame Julie, who lost her voice in an operation to remove non-cancerous polyps, said: 'I try the smallest, smallest moment of a song but I kind of sing speak as much as Rex Harrison used to do (in My Fair Lady).' Asked about the possibility of reconstructive surgery, she said: 'I don't think I'll be around by then, I mean there's all kinds of talk, but if you think about it I have a piece of chord missing and so can you imagine putting into a vocal chord exactly what vibrates correctly, what is smooth.'