vocalese


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vocalese

(ˌvəʊkəˈliːz)
n
(Jazz) jazz a style of jazz singing
References in periodicals archive ?
"Like scatting and vocalese, doo-wop offers an example of singers emulating instruments while also giving an insight into the relationship between semantic and non-semantic writing." An intriguing analysis written especially for academics and literary scholars, The Sound of Nonsense is an excellent contribution to college and graduate school literary studies shelves.
But she wanted to combine her love of jazz with musical theater in the style of "vocalese," which goes back to bebop music that used instrumental solo lines as melody.
Each song is its own feisty tour-de-force of arrangement and style, but the girls continued to stretch their talents with examples of bebop, hiphop and the ornamented vocalese style of jazz singing.
She is noted for her mesmerizing and captivating vocal improvisations and vocalese lyrics to instrumental solos.
He was a six-time Grammy Award nominee who sang with a wide range of techniques, from scatting and vocalese to spoken word.
Their critically revered album, 1985's ''Vocalese,'' earned a whopping 12 Grammy nominations.
Several of her contributions, notably "Folks", mesh well with the co-producer's honking horns, fidgety beats and multi-tracked wordless vocalese.
On the recording, Hughes is heard using vocalese, or lyrical or poetic lines said instead of sung, over bop melodies.
This innovation in jazz singing and composing came to be known as vocalese.
The work of all three memoirists may be read as a kind of 'vocalese,' the adaptation of new words and many voices to pre-arranged ancestral melodies, to tell stories and pay tribute to the composers and previous performers of those tunes.
And this holiday season he's unwrapping a special package--his first holiday album, AI Jarreau Christmas (Rhino), for which he devotes his sophisticated vocalese to a dozen yuletide classics.