voir dire

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voir dire

 (vwär dîr′)
n.
The formal examination of a prospective juror under oath to determine suitability for jury service or of a prospective witness under oath to determine competence to give testimony.
tr.v. voir dired, voir dir·ing, voir dires
To conduct a voir dire of: voir dired the witness.

[Anglo-Norman, to speak the truth : Latin vērus, true; see wērə-o- in Indo-European roots + Latin dīcere, to say; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

voir dire

(vwɑː ˈdɪə)
n
1. (Law) the preliminary examination on oath of a proposed witness by the judge
2. (Law) the oath administered to such a witness
[C17: from Old French: to speak the truth]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

voir dire

(ˈvwɑr ˈdɪər)

n.
the examination of a proposed witness or juror to ascertain the person's competence to give or hear testimony.
[1670–80; < Anglo-French, = Old French voir true, truly + dire to say]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Accountant expert witnesses are frequently asked the following type of voi dire question: "Are you an expert in the XYZ industry?" Obviously, the question is intended to imply that you do not have the appropriate experience or expertise on the subject matter.
Supreme Court Daubert decision, these motions (usually made after the voi dire) ask the judge to exclude the testimony of an expert witness based on "junk science" - or, in the case of accountants' testimony, on "junk economics." A discussion of the Daubert case and changes to the rules of evidence appeared in the January issue of The CPA Journal.