Volsung

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Related to Volsungs: Saga of the Volsungs

Volsung

(ˈvɒlsʊŋ)
n
1. (Norse Myth & Legend) a great hero of Norse and Germanic legend and poetry who gave his name to a race of warriors; father of Sigmund and Signy
2. (Norse Myth & Legend) any member of his family
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Shortly after this he became especially interested in Icelandic literature and published versions of some of its stories; notably one of the Siegfried tale, 'Sigurd the Volsung.
The Saga of the Volsungs is the most coherent account of the ill-fated romances, tragic murders, and epic wars of the Volsung family that medieval Scandinavian poems, sagas, and works of art allude to and celebrate.
As is well known, Tolkien's interest in dragons began as a child when he first read the story of Sigurd and the Volsungs in Andrew Lang's The Red Fairy Book.
In the Old Norse Saga of the Volsungs, a Valkyrie is punished by the Gods for defying them.
5), and on the first page of text in 'The Story of the Volsungs and Niblungs' of 1870 (Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Eng.
Among the translations, the most important are The Saga of the Volsungs, the saga of Regmer Lodbrok, together with the lay of Krake (1930), and Three Icelandic Sagas (translated together with M.
Laughing, singing, exulting--with their passion and their sword--the Volsungs ran out into the spring night.
The Volsungs (who include Siegfried, Sieglinde, and Siegmund) are descendants of God (Wotan's children and grandchildren).
the legendary Volsungs, uncle and nephew, whose valor is compared to Beowulf's.
Among them are The Saga of the Volsungs, Gustavus Vasa (a continuation of the story of the Vasa dynasty begun in Master Olaf ), Erik XIV, and Gustavus Adolphus.
From Celtic influences on Tolkien we move to the Norse legendarium and the Volsungs.
The philosopher was offended by the incestuous Volsungs in D/e Walkire - "One may forget morality," reads one of his marginalia, "but one must not slap it in the face" - and found especially repugnant Siegmund and Sieglinde's passionate coupling at the end of act 1: next to the stage direction "With a cry she sinks on his breast - the curtain quickly falls," Schopenhauer writes "and high time, too