euthanasia

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eu·tha·na·sia

 (yo͞o′thə-nā′zhə, -zhē-ə)
n.
The act or practice of ending the life of a person or animal having a terminal illness or a medical condition that causes suffering perceived as incompatible with an acceptable quality of life, as by lethal injection or the suspension of certain medical treatments.

[Greek euthanasiā, a good death : eu-, eu- + thanatos, death.]

euthanasia

(ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə) or

euthanasy

n
(Medicine) the act of killing someone painlessly, esp to relieve suffering from an incurable illness. Also called: mercy killing
[C17: via New Latin from Greek: easy death, from eu- + thanatos death]

eu•tha•na•sia

(ˌyu θəˈneɪ ʒə, -ʒi ə, -zi ə)

n.
Also called mercy killing. the act of putting to death painlessly or allowing to die, as by withholding medical measures from a person or animal suffering from an incurable, esp. a painful, disease or condition.
[1640–50; < New Latin < Greek euthanasía easy death]

euthanasia

1. the act of putting to death without pain a person incurably ill or suffering great pain; mercy killing.
2. an easy, painless death. — euthanasic, adj.
See also: Killing
the deliberate killing of painfully ill or terminally ill people to put them out of their misery. Also called mercy killing.
See also: Death
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.euthanasia - the act of killing someone painlessly (especially someone suffering from an incurable illness)euthanasia - the act of killing someone painlessly (especially someone suffering from an incurable illness)
kill, putting to death, killing - the act of terminating a life

euthanasia

noun mercy killing, assisted suicide the emotive question of whether euthanasia should be legalized
Translations
إماتَه رَحيمَه
eutanasimedlidenhedsdrab
eutanázia
líknardráp
eutanazijaneskausmingas numarinimas
eitanāzija
eutanázia
ötenazitatlı ölüm

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə] Neutanasia f

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪziə] neuthanasie f

euthanasia

nEuthanasie f

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə] neutanasia

euthanasia

(juːθəˈneiziə) noun
the painless killing of someone who is suffering from a painful and incurable illness. Many old people would prefer euthanasia to the suffering they have to endure.

eu·tha·na·si·a

n. eutanasia, muerte infringida sin sufrimiento en casos de una enfermedad incurable.

euthanasia

n eutanasia
References in periodicals archive ?
Voluntary euthanasia will become legal in Australia's second most populous state if the Bill is passed by the Parliament's upper chamber on October 31.
They had a kind of voluntary euthanasia or exit plan, a sort of Dignitas approach to the Lords.
8] Whether these rights are protected through 'passive' voluntary euthanasia or 'active' voluntary euthanasia makes no difference.
Of course, Belgium is a small country, but between 2007 and 2012, one in eight lung transplants came from patients who had donated them after voluntary euthanasia.
The report said that Philip Nitschke is planning to head the Voluntary Euthanasia Party tilt for a Senate seat while Senator Nick Xenophon has formed his own party to ensure that his name appears above the line on the Senate ballot paper, rather than being listed amid a group of other independents.
The purpose of this article is to develop offence-specific guidelines for how prosecutorial discretion should be exercised in cases of voluntary euthanasia and assisted suicide.
The debate on voluntary euthanasia generally refers to the autonomy borders and to its value in connection with other social values: do we have the right to die if we decide this and the wish to live disappears in order to leave room for the wish to die?
The Canadian panel therefore concluded that there is strong evidence to rebut one of the greatest fears that opponents of voluntary euthanasia or physician-assisted dying often voice -- that it is the first step down a slippery slope toward more widespread medical killing.
But he was vigorously opposed by pro-life lobbies, the authorities and even by those in favor of voluntary euthanasia, who considered that Kevorkian's morbid fascination with the point of departure cast their cause in an unfavorable light.
Australia has had strong advocacy for active voluntary euthanasia through voluntary euthanasia societies and the activities of particular individuals, eg Rod Syme and Philip Nitschke.
There is no evidence for this claim, even after many years of legal physician-assisted suicide or voluntary euthanasia in the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, Switzerland, and the American state of Oregon.
PRINCETON: Of all the arguments against voluntary euthanasia, the most influential is the "slippery slope": once we allow doctors to kill patients, we will not be able to limit the killing to those who want to die.

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