vomit comet


Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.

vomit comet

n
(Aeronautics) informal an aircraft that dives suddenly in altitude, simulating freefall, in order to allow astronauts to experience the nausea that can affect people in a gravity-free environment
References in periodicals archive ?
The suits were tested in a 32-story water tower, in the desert and on a plane known as the "vomit comet" that soared and dipped to provide moments of weightlessness.
The winners of the Mars 2117 Programme's initiative 'Zero Gravity competition', launched by the Mohammed Bin Rashid Space Centre (MBRSC), have carried out various experiments under different levels of gravity on board a parabolic flight in Florida, which is often dubbed as the 'Vomit Comet'.
When he wanted to ride Nasa's "vomit comet" to experience the sensation of weightlessness, it required that not only Stephen but also his caregivers go aboard -- which meant a lot of nauseous people on the flight.
He booked a seat on Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic sub-orbital space plane and rehearsed for the trip by floating inside a steep-diving Nasa aircraft - dubbed the "vomit comet" - used to simulate weightlessness.
Dave describes what it's like to live underwater, experience free-floating in micro-gravity in the "Vomit Comet" and eat bugs during wilderness training.
"In another scenario, subjects participated in a series of zero-g flights in the notorious 'Vomit Comet' aircraft to understand connections between body orientation and gravitational cues."
According to reports, 80 percent of people who ride in these planes become sick and throw up--which is where the name "Vomit Comet" comes in.
Christchurch emergency registrar Rachel Tullet spoke brilliantly about her research work aboard a parabolic flight aircraft ("the vomit comet") and trauma work in Nigeria.
Astronauts-intraining find out by taking a ride on NASA's "Vomit Comet," a plane that re-creates zero gravity by flying in a swooping arc.
The trip is not for the faint of stomach: NASA used to train astronauts on a fast-diving airplane that offered intervals of weightlessness and was nicknamed the Vomit Comet -- apparently for good reason.
Roach writes with mischievous humor, recounting her experiences aboard the C-9 transport jet referred to by aficionados of weightless flight simulation as the Vomit Comet, "though NASA would like them to stop." The parabolic flights of the C-9 allow brief (twenty-second) periods of weightlessness, which since the mid-1950s have enabled extensive testing of personnel and equipment.
Stewart trained at least 800 hours for the experience, putting in time in NASA's underwater lab and the Zero-Gravity Simulator--the infamous Vomit Comet. But none of it fully prepared him for space.