Vondel


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Vondel

(Dutch ˈvɔndəl)
n
(Biography) Joost van den (ˈjoːst vɑn dən). 1587–1679, Dutch poet and dramatist, author of the Biblical plays Lucifer (1654), Adam in Exile (1664), and Noah (1667)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Taft, "The Tragic Mary: A Case Study in Michael Field's Understanding of Sexual Politics," Nineteenth-Century Contexts 23 (2001): 266; Ritchie Robertson, "From Martyr to Vampire: The Figure of Mary Stuart in Drama from Vondel to Swinburne," in Who Is This Schiller Now?
The Dutch Shakespeare, Joost von den Vondel, grew up in a Mennonite congregation.)
Finally, the poet Joost van den Vondel (1587-1679) penned his "Inauguration of the Town Hall of Amsterdam" (Inwydinge van't Stadthuis t'Amsterdam), in which he proclaims Amsterdam the new Rome.
(94) As to the breadth issue, he argued that the Commonwealth's non-statutory executive power followed the contours of legislative power, (95) which was supported by Sir Samuel Griffith's draft version of s 61, (96) Sir Alfred Deakin's 'Vondel Opinion', (97) the decision in Johnson v Kent, (98) and various dicta in the AAP Case.
Vondelpark is also festooned with art works, the crowning glories must be Pablo Picasso's Fish from 1965 and the 1867 three-metre sculpture of Dutch poet Vondel in whose honour the park was named.
Vondel, "Sub-pixel edge detection", De Nayer Instituut, 2004.
On April 18, 1641, Joost van den Vondel's Brothers (Gebroeders) premiered in the new Amsterdam playhouse.
The fact that the two artists widely regarded as the greatest of Dutch poets and painters-Joost van den Vondel and Rembrandt van Rijn--were both shaped by the Mennonite community surely indicates something important about the Dutch Mennonite community and its contribution to the cultural flourishing of a seventeenth-century Golden Age.