voting machine

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vot·ing machine

(vō′tĭng)
n.
An apparatus for use in polling places that mechanically records and counts votes.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

voting machine

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (esp in the US) a machine at a polling station that voters operate to register their votes and that mechanically or electronically counts all votes cast
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

vot′ing machine`


n.
a mechanical or electronic apparatus used in a polling place to register and count the votes.
[1895–1900]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.voting machine - a mechanical device for recording and counting votes mechanicallyvoting machine - a mechanical device for recording and counting votes mechanically
mechanical device - mechanism consisting of a device that works on mechanical principles
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Wahlmaschine
References in periodicals archive ?
The Commission on Elections said that it does not have any plans to buy P60 billion worth of touchscreen Direct Recording Electronic (DRE) voting machines to replace the Precinct Count Optical Scan (PCOS) machines.
In tough budget times, with looming layoffs and elimination of programs and services, the last thing a community wants to think about is spending scarce dollars to replace voting machines, especially when they work just fine.
Congress has done a terrible job of regulating electronic voting: It allowed A.T.M.-style voting machines to proliferate without requiring them to produce a paper trail that can be audited to ensure that the results are accurate.
The Craighead County Election Commission said it doesn't have enough room to store its new voting machines.
Maryland Governor Robert Ehrlich has recently urged scrapping that state's recently-purchased electronic voting machines and replacing them with paper ballots for this upcoming election because of technical and human "problems" with the machines in the primaries.
During a debate on June 5, the three Republican candidates for Georgia Secretary of State only agreed on one thing: The state's electronic voting machines need to produce a paper trail.
And I endorsed Gumbel's conclusion: Touch-screen, Direct Recording Electronic (DRE) voting machines reflect an all-too-common stampede to apply a relatively untested, "latest and greatest" technology to voting.
In addition, voters encountered polls that opened hours late and other inadequate polling place procedures and problems with voter registration systems, provisional ballots and voting machines. At the same time, however, voter participation was higher with voter mobilization (see youth vote sidebar, p.
I'VE ALWAYS WONDERED why people in the United States (and some other countries) have been so anxious to use voting machines when it has been shown in Canada that the tried-and-true manual method is the most efficient and foolproof.
Ohio is the home of Diebold Election Systems, a major purveyor of touchscreen voting machines that, unlike the ATMs the company also manufactures, have no paper trail.
One nephew, who manages a fast food joint in Oklahoma, writes that the answer is "one word: RECALL." But my brother, a realtor in Missouri, doesn't want to bother with any more voting machines. In the event of massive fraud, he writes, "It would be time for a 'New Revolution'!
NOD believes important provisions of the bill that will benefit the disability community include requiring at least one voting machine that is accessible to people with disabilities at each polling place and providing funding to buy out punch-card and lever voting machines in favor of more user-friendly ones.