International Phonetic Alphabet

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International Phonetic Alphabet

n. Abbr. IPA
A phonetic alphabet and diacritic modifiers sponsored by the International Phonetic Association to provide a uniform and universally understood system for transcribing the speech sounds of all languages.

International Phonetic Alphabet

n
(Phonetics & Phonology) a series of signs and letters propagated by the Association Phonétique Internationale for the representation of human speech sounds. It is based on the Roman alphabet but supplemented by modified signs or symbols from other writing systems, and is usually employed in its revised form of 1951. Abbreviation: IPA

Interna′tional Phonet′ic Al′phabet


n.
a set of symbols and modifying signs devised by the International Phonetic Association to provide a universally understood system for transcribing the speech sounds of any language. Abbr.: IPA

International Phonetic Alphabet

A system developed during the late 19th century to symbolize every sound used in human language accurately. Used in the scientific study of pronunciation.
Translations
mezinárodní fonetická abeceda
tarptautinė fonetinė abėcėlė
Internationaal Fonetisch Alfabet
alfabetul fonetic internaţional

International Phonetic Alphabet

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References in periodicals archive ?
Optimal vowel space combined with an energized and released articulatory apparatus gives the voice freedom to flourish.
Figure 3 shows the placement of the vowels within the vowel space as produced by the Speaker.
(http://www.haskins.yale.edu/Reprints/HL0080.pdf) For the longest time , scientists attributed this to a difference in the anatomy of vocal tracts, suggesting that monkeys' "acoustic vowel space" was more restricted than that of humans.
The use of these three vowels provided a way to measure maximum vowel space acoustically occupied by each participant.
Long vowels enclose more vowel space than that of short vowels.
Figure 3 displays the six diphthongs in Q2 and Q3 in F1-F2 vowel space. The mean values of Kihnu monophthongs are marked with grey letters.
van de Weijer (2001) observed that ID speech exhibits an enlarged vowel space in content words but a reduced vowel space in function words (which form the larger part of everyday speech--Cutler, 1993 -).
In his pioneering work on phonetic symbolism, Sapir (1921, 1925, 1927, 1929) firmly established the unconsciously cogent correlation between speakers' perception of vowel-size differences and actual motor-acoustic (dis)similarities in the vowel space. In the case of English, symbolic magnitude patterns appear to be governed by three factors working in unison to present the same picture of a vowel sequence as that found on the symbolic scale: "(1) the receding positions of articulation made by the tongue within the mouth, (2) the decreasing frequencies of vocalic resonance as measured acoustically, and (3) the increasing size of the oral cavity used in pronunciation" (Newman, 1933: 61).
Given that F1 inversely correlates with vowel height and F2 correlates with backness, the vowel plot roughly represents the vowel space. The results indicate that there is no overlap in vowel space between the different vowel qualities.
In a nutshell, such two-feature changes may be conceived of as a result of gaps in the vowel space and the preference for using old over new categories.