Vulgate


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vul·gate

 (vŭl′gāt′, -gĭt)
n.
1. The common speech of a people; the vernacular.
2. A widely accepted text or version of a work.
3. Vulgate The Latin edition or translation of the Bible made by Saint Jerome at the end of the fourth century ad, now used in a revised form as the Roman Catholic authorized version.

[Medieval Latin Vulgāta, from Late Latin vulgāta (editiō), popular (edition), from Latin, feminine past participle of vulgāre, to make known to all, from vulgus, the common people.]

vulgate

(ˈvʌlɡeɪt; -ɡɪt)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a commonly recognized text or version
2. everyday or informal speech; the vernacular
adj
generally accepted; common

Vulgate

(ˈvʌlɡeɪt; -ɡɪt)
n
(Bible)
a. (from the 13th century onwards) the fourth-century version of the Bible produced by Jerome, partly by translating the original languages, and partly by revising the earlier Latin text based on the Greek versions
b. (as modifier): the Vulgate version.
[C17: from Medieval Latin Vulgāta, from Late Latin vulgāta editiō popular version (of the Bible), from Latin vulgāre to make common, from vulgus the common people]

Vul•gate

(ˈvʌl geɪt, -gɪt)

n.
1. a Latin version of the Bible prepared chiefly by Saint Jerome at the end of the 4th century A.D. and used as an authorized version of the Roman Catholic Church.
2. (l.c.) any commonly recognized text or version of a work.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to the Vulgate.
4. (l.c.) commonly used or accepted; common.
[1605–15; < Late Latin vulgāta (editiō) popular (edition); vulgāta, feminine past participle of vulgāre to make common, publish, derivative of vulgus the public]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Vulgate - the Latin edition of the Bible translated from Hebrew and Greek mainly by St. Jerome at the end of the 4th century; as revised in 1592 it was adopted as the official text for the Roman Catholic Church
Church of Rome, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church, Roman Catholic - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
Translations

Vulgate

[ˈvʌlgɪt] NVulgata f

Vulgate

nVulgata f

Vulgate

[ˈvʌlgeɪt] n (Bible) the Vulgatela Vulgata
References in classic literature ?
``one of those disorderly men, who, taking on them the sacred character without due cause, profane the holy rites, and endanger the souls of those who take counsel at their hands; lapides pro pane condonantes iis, giving them stones instead of bread as the Vulgate hath it.''
Ossa enis perfringam, I will break your bones, as the Vulgate hath it.''
The basis of the translation was necessarily the Latin 'Vulgate' (Common) version, made nine hundred years before from the original Hebrew and Greek by St.
The greatest number of New Testament texts are in Greek, but there are early Latin texts, parts of which were incorporated into the Vulgate. The New Testament is by far the best - preserved document from the ancient world; there are about 175 papyri from the 2nd to the 4th centuries and close to 3,000 manuscripts that date from before the invention of printing.
Carroll analyses the gradual conflation of meaning of cite and vile in the Vulgate Cycle, while E.
It will be noted that most of these readings are restricted to eighth-century witnesses (the exceptions being the two verb variations, which are of a sort quite likely to occur spontaneously) and they may represent fairly common early Vulgate textual traditions, although none occurs, of course, in Amiatinus.
Leopolita Bible A polish translation of the Vulgate by John of Lemberg (ancient Leopolis), published in 1561 at Cracow.
In the early part of the 13th-century prose Vulgate cycle, courtly love was exalted through the passion of Lancelot and Guinevere; but, in the austerely spiritual part of the Vulgate cycle, the Queste del Saint Graal, their adulterous love stood condemned, and Lancelot was unable to look directly at the Holy Grail because of it.
He sets forth his methods very clearly, proceeding, for example, to establish the type of biblical text which Andrew used by comparing his citations with the families of manuscripts identified in the great modern editions of the Vulgate. There are some severe looking tables hereabouts, and at times the sheer quantity of detailed information becomes almost overwhelming.
He drew mostly from the Book of Ezekiel but also other biblical passages in Greek, Hebrew, Vulgate Latin, and Arabic.
Fray Luis' succinct defense beautifully telescopes his contribution to the post-Tridentine debates on the canonical status of the Latin Vulgate, the question of vernacular Bibles and the applicability of humanist philology to Christian exegesis.
The Catholic Church is using the Latin Vulgate translation of the Bible to try to determine the best phrasing.