WH question

WH question

n
(Linguistics) a question in English to which an appropriate answer is to give information rather than to answer "yes" or "no": typically introduced by the word who, which, what, where, when, or how. Also called: information question
References in periodicals archive ?
We may summarize the difference in predictions thus: the categorical account type requires that a particular wh-item in situ in a multiple wh question will either be possible or impossible; for example, indirect objects will or will not be acceptable in situ.
It is a well-known fact that a focus in the answer correlates (ideally) (24) with a wh word in the preceding wh question. This effect has made wh questions a favorite test for focus.
He thinks of a wh question as a completive focusing construction (a notion originating from Dik et al.
Von Stechow and Uhmann (1986) interpret representations such as (13) as focus ambiguities; each F-marking represents a particular reading that the sentence may have in the context of an appropriate wh question. This is not the interpretation of Selkirk, who argues that focus may be contained in focus as a result of a recursive application of (17).
(62) is a focused wh question, which corresponds to a focused answer in Akan; (63) is a possible reply to (62).
This clearly shows that the question is not a yes-no question, but rather a wh question. However, our informants admit that there is a slight feeling of indefiniteness in a wh question with ma.
We want professionals to be able to answer all WH questions," added Lachapelle.
Criminal Investigation as an inquisitive process starts with WH questions: What, Where, How and Who .Legally speaking, the process proceeds with one fundamental question: has a crime been committed in violation of an existing law?
'Then I go back to the first page and write the questions--usually WH questions, but sometimes a yes/no question.
Nott discusses different ways of asking questions, word order in Yes/No questions, WH words in French and English (in the form of a table), word order in WH questions, indirect questions, and the use of 'comme', 'comment', and 'combien' in direct and indirect questions.
It is of interest that, if a choice-function analysis for wh expressions is taken as providing a semantics of wh questions as a restriction on possible substituends provided by the answer, then it stands in a similar but converse relation to a choice-function analysis of indefinites that definite noun phrases do.
(1999, 2000) find auch `too' earlier than sentence negation with nicht and wh questions. Furthermore, Penner et al.