WH-word

Related to WH-word: Interrogatives

WH-word

or wh-word

(ˈdʌb əl yuˈeɪtʃˌwɜrd)

n.
an interrogative or relative pronoun in English, typically beginning with wh-, as what, why, where, which, who, or how.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, if the what-phrase is considered to be the standard wh-word for clausal complements, then the sentence (19b) would be analyzed as a version of (19a), as exemplified by Fanselow (2006 : 451) for German; a similar analysis seems to apply for the Estonian sentences (20a) and (20b).
In effect, the argument goes that, since inversion is obligatory in case there is a wh-element in Spec, CP--note the contrast between (21a) and (21b)--then (20b), where no inversion applies, is not possible because there is no Spec, CP available for the wh-word que 'what' to move through on its way to initial position.
The grammar words that have emerged as collocators are the following prepositions and conjunctions: against (collocating with declare, pronounce 2), among (collocating with elect), as (in agreement with appoint and elect), between (with elect), by (with all), for (with declare and pronounce 1), from (two meanings, with excommunicate and elect), on (declare and pronounce 2), that (declare 2, pronounce 2), to (appoint and elect), wh-word (declare).
The wh-word man 'who' in (40) is used to refer to an individuated set of persons or a single person out of a set of possible persons who could have arrived.
The next subsection deals with questions having a WH-word, i.e., WH-questions.
This suggests very strongly that sluicing is not fed by wh-movement, even though much of the literature suggests otherwise, since wh-movement in Dutch does not allow for preposition stranding, except when the wh-word is also an R-word: waar.
The questions could be those requiring yes/no answers (known as yes/no questions) or wh-questions (those beginning with wh-words: what, when, where, which, how).
The difference is that Zoque does not have relative clauses introduced by wh-words or complementizers, and it lacks copula verbs.
It is not used in questions with interrogative words, the equivalents of "wh-words" in English.