intelligence quotient

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intelligence quotient

n. Abbr. IQ
1. A number seen as a measure of a person's intelligence, usually representing the person's score on an intelligence test as expressed in relation to the scores of others who have taken the same test, with the average score set at 100.
2. The ratio of tested mental age to chronological age, usually expressed as a quotient multiplied by 100. No longer in scientific use.

intelligence quotient

n
(Psychology) a measure of the intelligence of an individual derived from results obtained from specially designed tests. The quotient is traditionally derived by dividing an individual's mental age by his chronological age and multiplying the result by 100. Abbreviation: IQ

intel′ligence quo`tient


n.
an intelligence test score that is obtained by dividing mental age, which reflects the age-graded level of performance as derived from population norms, by chronological age and multiplying by 100: a score of 100 thus indicates a performance at exactly the normal level for that age group. Abbr.: IQ
[1920–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intelligence quotient - a measure of a person's intelligence as indicated by an intelligence test; the ratio of a person's mental age to their chronological age (multiplied by 100)
ratio - the relative magnitudes of two quantities (usually expressed as a quotient)
adult intelligence - the average IQ of the adults in a given population
borderline intelligence - the minimal IQ required for someone to function normally and independently in the world (without some form of institutional assistance)
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to successfully complete the training the student should administer the WISC-III test to two children in a supervised environment and to be approved in a written test before starting collecting data.
Based on t-tests, no significant sex differences in mean WISC-III test performance across the seven summary scores were found (all p [is greater than] .
The absence of significant differences in New Zealander's SB-FE and WISC-III test performance in the current study is not consistent with previous findings on their predecessors (e.