Wa'n't

1.A colloquial contraction of was not.
References in classic literature ?
When you fellers was his age, you wa'n't dry behind the ears yet.
wa'n't ary a steamboat or ary a trading-post, and we cusses had to
"Say, Miss Pollyanna, do you mean--was you playin' that 'ere game THEN--about my bein' glad I wa'n't named Hephzibah'?"
"There wa'n't many names left when your mother got through choosin'!
"Was pretty good fight, wa'n't it?" he timidly said.
"Was pretty good fight, wa'n't it?" he began in a small voice, and then he achieved the forti- tude to continue.
Blumenthal's [Flora's], I feel as if the roots o' things wa'n't killed.
I wa'n't goin' to keep nothin' of Egypt on me, an' so I went to the Lord an' asked him to give me a new name.
Besides, I reckon that wa'n't murder when Marse Prosser kilt old Bundy." (60-61)
Additionally, lexicographers and dialect geographers have by no means been in agreement when it comes to classifying the full form underlying wa'n't: thus, the New English Dictionary listed wa'n't and warn't as the negative constructions of nonstandard were (1888: 717), whereas DARE (vol.
I wa'n't goin to keep nothin' of Egypt on me, an 'so I went to the Lord an' asked him to give me a new name.
But don't draw off too suddenly as if you didn't like him--that's worse still [...] There's a medium in all things, and you must just manage it, as if you wa'n't thinking at all about him, or love, or a husband, or anything [...] But make him speak out, Margaret--get him to say the word, and don't let him be too free until he does [...] He'll be ready for any terms; and look you, when a man's ready, none of your long bargains.