Wafd

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Wafd

(wɒft)
n
(Historical Terms) a nationalist Egyptian political party: founded in 1924 and dissolved in 1952
[Arabic: deputation]
ˈWafdist n, adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The Wafdist newspaper "Al Misri" said the new steps were being considered by the Egyptian government, which might extend to breaking off of diplomatic relations with Britain and expulsion of all Britons in Egypt.
Additionally in the same governorate, in Talkha constituency, Al-Faraeen TV channel owner Tawfiq Okasha seems to be in intense competition with former Wafdist leader Fouad Badrawy and another independent candidate named Bassem Falayfel.
R Graves, Acting Director-General of the Ministry of the Interior, commented: "The spirit of Islam is well brought out by the fact that not one of them uttered a word of regret for killing a Christian." (113) It is also worth noting that the question of possible implication in anti-British violence hung over other prominent Wafdists for years, such as Mahmud Fahmi al-Nuqrashi who, despite protests from the British government, was included in Mustafa al-Nahas Pasha's Wafdist Cabinet of January 1930.
(32) Sultan (later King) Fuad summed up the power which Safiyya Zaghlul yielded within the Wafdist nationalist movement when he noted the 'extraordinary influence of the women and particularly of Madame Sa'ad Zaghlul in exciting native hostility to the British.' (33)
The roughly 30 members mulling a walkout include political analysts Wahid Abdel-Meguid and Manar El-Shorbagi; political and law professors Gaber Nassar, Souad Rizk and Abdel-Gelil Moustafa; political activists Ayman Nour, Anwar El-Sadat and Salah Hassaballah; and former Wafdist MPs Mohamed Dawoud, Fouad Badrawi and Ibrahim Kamel.
Another Wafdist leader, Issam Sheha, says the pact already was considered dead when the "Brotherhoodraised slogans calling for a religious state".
(41) The MB emerged in 1928 when the secular-nationalist Wafdist Party and the royal family ruled the country.
The Egyptian Gazette which voiced their social anxiety wrote disapprovingly: "The fruits of recent Wafdist propaganda were reaped yesterday when disgraceful scenes turned the solemn funeral procession of Egypt's two airmen ...
He instead argues that Western intelligence agencies played a large role in fostering radical elements of political Islam, from British MI6 efforts to promote the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood in opposition to Wafdist Party nationalism to the American Central Intelligence Agency's promotion of Islamist insurgency against the Soviets in Afghanistan.
Aside from periods when the 1923 Constitution was temporarily replaced, Egypt might have come close to qualifying as a polyarchy/democracy except in terms of the Third Dimension, that is, the inability of the popularly elected Wafdist majorities effectively to govern in the face of monarchical and British domination.
As a young woman she worked for a Wafdist (Nationalist Party) publication in London ('I went about telling everyone that the Egyptians were quite capable of governing themselves - God forgive me!') where she met her future husband, a Wafdist lawyer.
(Wafdist Ayman Nour, who is not on good terms with his party chairman, has been said to sympathize with such a formation).