Wagon jack

Wagon jack

A Jack intended for raising a wagon axle two or three inches so that a wheel could be removed or partially pulled off for greasing. When a light farm wagon was empty, greasing was generally done by manually lifting one corner of the wagon, sliding the wheel partially off the iron skein, and putting grease only on the exposed section. Later, after the wheel was reinstalled and began rotating, the grease would work its way over the whole wheel bearing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wagon jack. Photo submitted by Ralph Farnsworth, New Haven, Vt.
Patent 420,400: Wagon jack. Patent granted to Nathaniel Allen, Lowell, Mass., assignor to Joseph Battles, Lawrence, Mass., Jan.
Salaman's Dictionary of Woodworking Tools (.1975) describes a factory-made "timber jack" built in Germany in 1677 that is similar to the historical society's Conestoga wagon jack. If youknow of an older jack than that one, emil me at manning39@msn.com.
Collector Stan Wolf, featured in an article beginning on page 22, counts among his favorite treasures a wagon jack built 150 years ago for his grandfather by a local blacksmith.
Many carpenters and planing mills began to fabricate buggy and wagon jacks for commercial distribution.