waif

(redirected from Waifish)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

waif 1

 (wāf)
n.
1.
a. A homeless person, especially a forsaken or orphaned child.
b. An abandoned young animal.
2. A person, especially a young woman, who is thin or gaunt.
3. Something found and unclaimed, as an object cast up by the sea.

[Middle English, ownerless property, stray animal, from Anglo-Norman, probably of Scandinavian origin; see weip- in Indo-European roots.]

waif 2

 (wāf)
n. Nautical
See waft.

[Probably of Scandinavian origin; see weip- in Indo-European roots.]

waif

(weɪf)
n
1. (Sociology) a person, esp a child, who is homeless, friendless, or neglected
2. anything found and not claimed, the owner being unknown
3. (Nautical Terms) nautical another name for waft5
4. (Law) law obsolete a stolen article thrown away by a thief in his flight and forfeited to the Crown or to the lord of the manor
[C14: from Anglo-Norman, variant of Old Northern French gaif, of Scandinavian origin; related to Old Norse veif a flapping thing]
ˈwaifˌlike, ˈwaifish adj

waif


(wāf),
n.
1. a person, esp. a child, who has no home.
2. a stray animal, whose owner is not known.
3. a stray item or article.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French, orig. lost, stray, unclaimed (compare Old French guaif stray beast) < Scandinavian; compare Old Norse veif movement to and fro; see waive]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.waif - a homeless child especially one forsaken or orphanedwaif - a homeless child especially one forsaken or orphaned; "street children beg or steal in order to survive"
child, kid, minor, nipper, tiddler, youngster, tike, shaver, small fry, nestling, fry, tyke - a young person of either sex; "she writes books for children"; "they're just kids"; "`tiddler' is a British term for youngster"

waif

noun stray, orphan, outcast, urchin, foundling an emaciated waif living rough on the streets
Translations
شارِد، شَخْص أو حَيَوان ضال
hjemløst barn
lelenc
umkomuleysingi; munaîarleysingi
benamis vaikas
bezpajumtnieks
kimsesiz çocuk

waif

[weɪf] N (= child) → niño/a m/f abandonado/a, niño/a m/f desamparado/a; (= animal) → animal m abandonado
waifs and strays (= children) → niños mpl abandonados or desamparados; (= animals) → animales mpl abandonados

waif

[ˈweɪf] ngamin(e) m/f des rues
waif-like → au physique de gamin(e) des rues

waif

nobdachloses or heimatloses Kind; (= animal)herrenloses Tier; the poor little waifdas arme kleine Ding, hat kein Zuhause, …; waifs and strays (= children)obdachlose or heimatlose Kinder pl; (= animals)herrenlose Tiere pl

waif

[weɪf] nbambino/a abbandonato/a; (slight person) → creatura gracile
waifs and strays → trovatelli mpl

waif

(weif) noun
a stray, uncared-for child. a poor little waif.
References in periodicals archive ?
Katie Walsh writes based off the trailer and poster, many have surmised that this is Aronofsky's tribute to Rosemary's Baby, and there are similarities: the waifish young blonde wife (Lawrence), the egotistical artist husband (Bardem), the overbearing older couple (Ed Harris and Michelle Pfeiffer), who make themselves at home despite the discomfort of the subservient, passive bride.
The waifish Brit model was another '90s symbol, the ultimate cool-girl icon of the decade.
There were comparisons to previous girlfriends, all of whom had been waifish blue-blooded blondes.
Timid and waifish, the woman's girls hid behind her legs, peering around the shop with liquid eyes.
Winona was the emblematic star of her '90s heyday: waifish but iconoclastic, and equally at home in buttoned-up period pieces like The Age of Innocence as she was in Tim Burton films or the iconic coming-of-age portrait Reality Bites where she played a grunge-era everygirl.
My camera is in my hands; I raise it, take the incredible picture of my sister shaking hands with Gold, then being led away by a waifish young man with gelled hair and a clipboard.
The images of female bodies which dominate print, TV, cinema and internet media repeat the same physical model, a model constructed artificially with sophisticated photographic technology (photoshop and air brushing) and glorified by its exemplification in rich and famous singers and actresses, a body model which is not only waifish but often emaciated, almost anorexic and at any rate undernourished and medically unhealthy.
In previous years it has been hibernating bears being forced out of their sleep by needy rabbits, toy penguins coming to life, waifish models and TV presenters as fairies and the oddest of all, one featuring Jools Holland grinning inanely and "treating" us to his grating boogie woogie piano.
The Gothic mansion and elaborate costumes tap into the old world era and help the thriller along nicely, as does Thomas' crisp English accent and waifish good looks.
Commercial/fashion photographer Roe Ethridge's Louise with Red Bag (2011) shows a waifish blonde in a bathing suit staring away from the viewer.
In Marion Nelson's screenplay, Robyn (Mia Wasikowska) is a waifish wanderer in search of solitude--the kind of restless, lonesome spirit who, even in the middle of a psychedelic be-in, retreats into the calm of her own mind, yearning to be far from other people.
The other beneficiary of Antonio's affections is Lucia (Livia Rossi), a waifish young woman of about Ivo's age.