waiver

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waiver

intentional relinquishment of a right; the document that evidences a waiver: She signed a waiver.
Not to be confused with:
waver – vacillate; fluctuate; hesitate; falter; sway: She wanted to go, but her doubts made her waver.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

waiv·er

 (wā′vər)
n.
1.
a. Intentional relinquishment of a right, claim, or privilege.
b. The document that evidences such relinquishment.
2. A dispensation, as from a rule or penalty.
3. Permission for a professional athletic club to assign a player to the minor leagues or release a player from the club, granted only after all other clubs have been given the opportunity to claim the player and have not done so.
4. A deferment.
tr.v. wai·vered, wai·ver·ing, wai·vers
To provide with a waiver or issue a waiver for.
Idioms:
clear waivers
To be unclaimed by another professional club and therefore liable to be assigned to a minor-league club or released.
on waivers
In a state of being available for claiming by other professional clubs.

[Anglo-Norman weyver, from weyver, to abandon; see waive.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

waiver

(ˈweɪvə)
n
1. (Law) the voluntary relinquishment, expressly or by implication, of some claim or right
2. (Law) the act or an instance of relinquishing a claim or right
3. (Law) a formal statement in writing of such relinquishment
[C17: from Old Northern French weyver to relinquish, waive]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

waiv•er

(ˈweɪ vər)

n.
1. the intentional relinquishment of a right.
2. an express or written statement specifying this.
[1620–30; < Anglo-French weyver, n. use of infinitive: to waive; see -er3]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.waiver - a formal written statement of relinquishment
relinquishing, relinquishment - the act of giving up and abandoning a struggle or task etc.
granting immunity, exemption, immunity - an act exempting someone; "he was granted immunity from prosecution"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

waiver

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

waiver

noun
1. A giving up of a possession, claim, or right:
2. The act of putting off or the condition of being put off:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
zrzeczenie się

waiver

[ˈweɪvəʳ] N
1. (= renouncement) [of right, claim, fee] → renuncia f
2. (= exoneration) (from payment) → exoneración f
3. (= suspension) [of regulation, condition, restriction] → exención f
4. (= disclaimer) [of responsibility] → descargo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

waiver

[ˈweɪvər] ndispense f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

waiver

n (Jur) → Verzicht m (→ of auf +acc); (= document)Verzichterklärung f; (of law, contract, clause)Außerkraftsetzung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

waiver

[ˈweɪvəʳ] nrinuncia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
Collins Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
There are several types of waivers available, each of which applies to a different group of family members.
Finally, the court was not moved by the defendant's assertion that the colloquy lacked certain "essential factors" regarding the jury trial process since "most jurisdictions" require waivers to demonstrate three elements: that the accused is informed that the jury will be chosen from the members of the community, that the verdict must be unanimous, and that the defendant will be allowed to participate in the selection of the jury panel.
The USCIS is already overworked and backlogged without the embassy adding to that workload by sending back approved provisional waivers for fraud based on overstaying decades ago.
IANS New Delhi The All India Kisan Sabha (AIKS) on Wednesday condemned as "insensitive" a statement of Prime Minister Narendra Modi equating farm loan waivers to lollipops.
New York: Fitch Ratings said recent decisions concerning state Medicaid waivers will add to challenges states are facing controlling healthcare costs by limiting the ability to manage expenditure growth and potentially raising the number of uninsured.
Since a waiver of the statute of limitations is a derogation of the taxpayer's right to security against prolonged and unscrupulous investigations, our Court ruled that waivers of this kind must be carefully and strictly construed.
There are no implications on non-performing assets (NPAs) of banks because of farm loan waivers provided by various states, RBI Governor Urjit Patel.
The State Department says it has granted hundreds of waivers, but declined to say who received them and how.
This week, the FDA released its draft guidance, Waivers, Exceptions, and Exemptions from the Requirements of Section 582 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act Guidance for Industry.
Global energy companies Chevron (CVX) and Exxon Mobil (XOM) have asked the Environmental Protection Agency for hardship waivers, or exemptions to the nation's biofuels policy, that have typically been reserved for small companies in financial distress, Reuters reports, citing sources familiar with the matter.
But the most important question on the minds of many state policymakers is what happens to Medicaid, and Medicaid's future will be heavily tied to the usage of the 1332 waivers.