Wakefield


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Related to Wakefield: Andrew Wakefield

Wake·field

 (wāk′fēld′)
A city of north-central England east-northeast of Manchester. In the Battle of Wakefield (1460) Richard Plantagenet, the third duke of York (1411-1460), was slain by Lancastrian forces in the Wars of the Roses.

Wakefield

(ˈweɪkˌfiːld)
n
1. (Placename) a city in N England, in Wakefield unitary authority, West Yorkshire: important since medieval times as an agricultural and textile centre. Pop: 76 886 (2001)
2. (Placename) a unitary authority in N England, in West Yorkshire. Pop: 318 300 (2003 est). Area: 333 sq km (129 sq miles)

Wake•field

(ˈweɪkˌfild)

n.
a city in West Yorkshire, in N England. 317,300.
References in classic literature ?
Had his acquaintances been asked, who was the man in London the surest to perform nothing today which should be remembered on the morrow, they would have thought of Wakefield.
Let us now imagine Wakefield bidding adieu to his wife.
Perhaps the most interesting of them all are the Wakefield plays.
Wakefield Damon, who had a curious habit of "blessing" everything that happened to strike his fancy.
The "livre de lecture" was the "Vicar of Wakefield," much used in foreign schools because it is supposed to contain prime samples of conversational English; it might, however, have been a Runic scroll for any resemblance the words, as enunciated by Jules, bore to the language in ordinary use amongst the natives of Great Britain.
I then began at the very beginning of the "Vicar of Wakefield," and read, in a slow, distinct voice, some twenty pages, they all the while sitting mute and listening with fixed attention; by the time I had done nearly an hour had elapsed.
In Les Courbezon, the French Vicar of Wakefield, as Sainte-Beuve declared, with this imposing background, the Church and the world, as they shape themselves in the Cevennes, the priest and the peasant, occupy about an equal share of interest.
Gentleman Wakefield,' used to do the same of a Sunday as o' weekdays, and took no heed to right or wrong, as if there was nayther God nor devil.
She never finds herself very soon, so the minute her cap began to bob like a top-heavy dahlia, I whipped the VICAR OF WAKEFIELD out of my pocket, and read away, with one eye on him and one on Aunt.
I never liked any clergyman except the Vicar of Wakefield and Mr.
From that blessed little room, Roderick Random, Peregrine Pickle, Humphrey Clinker, Tom Jones, the Vicar of Wakefield, Don Quixote, Gil Blas, and Robinson Crusoe, came out, a glorious host, to keep me company.
Treating of its general characteristics, I should be disposed to say that it is more provincial than Boston or New York, and that there is afloat in the fair city, an assumption of taste and criticism, savouring rather of those genteel discussions upon the same themes, in connection with Shakspeare and the Musical Glasses, of which we read in the Vicar of Wakefield.