Walapai


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Related to Walapai: Hualapai Indian Reservation

Wa·la·pai

 (wä′lə-pī′)
n.
Variant of Hualapai.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Walapai - a member of a North American people formerly living in the Colorado river valley in ArizonaWalapai - a member of a North American people formerly living in the Colorado river valley in Arizona
Hoka, Hokan - a member of a North American Indian people speaking one of the Hokan languages
2.Walapai - the Yuman language spoken by the WalapaiWalapai - the Yuman language spoken by the Walapai
Yuman - a group of language of the Hokan family in Arizona and California and Mexico
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
America): Lushootseed; Chehalis, Cowlitz; Upper Chinook; Nez Perce; Western Sahaptin; Lillooet; Shuswap; Thompson; Tillamook; Okanagon, Sanpoil; Kalispel, Coeur dAlene; Kutenai; Quileute, Chemakum; Quinault; Umpqua, Coquille, Tututni; Coos; Yurok; Karok; Klamath, Modoc; Maidu; Pomo; Wintu; Northern Shoshone; Navajo; Jicarilla Apache; Hopi; Tiwa, Tewa, Towa; Western Apache; Zuni; Chiricahua Apache; Lipan Apache; Chemehuevi; Southern Paiute; Walapai, Havasupai, Yavapai; Northern Paiute; Ute; Western Shoshoni, Gosiute; Micmac;
The next section of the book, focusing strongly on the Southwest region, contains a large quantity of postcards depicting the landscape, peoples, dances and ceremonies, daily life and architecture of the region, including representative examples of most tribes Yuma, Maricopa, Mojave, Havasupai, Walapai, Pima, Papago, the various Puebloan groups, as well as the Apache and Navajo.
The Grand Canyon Resort Corporation's properties include Grand Canyon West, the Grand Canyon Skywalk, Hualapai River Runners, the Zipline at Grand Canyon West, the Hualapai Lodge, Hualapai Ranch and the Walapai Market.
(29.) For examples of people meeting their spouses in the Indian Service or schools see Flora Gregg Iliff, People of the Blue Water: My Adventures Among the Walapai and Havasupai Indians (New York: Harper Brothers Publishers, 1954), 255-256 and Esther Burnett Horne, Essie's Story: The Life and Legacy of a Shoshone Teacher (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1998), 58-60.
Kroeber, ed., Walapai Ethnography, Memoirs of the American Anthropological Association (1935; reprint, Milwood NY: Kraus Reprint Company, 1976), 47; U.S.
October 11 to 13, Kingman, Walapai Free Trappers' Third Annual Rendezvous expects 20 lodges, 80 in period dress.
They write, "Pais born after the Walapai War could not inform ethnographers about subtribal structure with complete accuracy because they never experienced it, and learned about it only from oral history."(38) According to this argument Pai informants lacked proper knowledge of preconquest realities and were actually describing postconquest structures.
McGuire, "Walapai," in Alfonso Ortiz, ed., Handbook of North American Indians 10 Southwest (1983):30-32.
They plotted to kill Crook when he next visited the post, but Walapai scouts informed army officers of the plot.
We reported thirteen Pai names for bands extant around 1860, and grouped them in three named subtribes identified by the Pai themselves.(4) Even Braatz labeled the Walapai and Havasupai as "a single social field of thirteen regional bands"(5)
For example, the 112 biographies in a recent Encyclopedia of North American Indians include fifteen Iroquois, fourteen Sioux, thirteen Cherokees, six Creeks, four Navajos, three Apaches, and even one aberrant Yavapai, but not one Walapai.(9)
The articles also agree that Pai local bands formed larger regional bands, but disagree on the nature of those larger units.(1) The Hualapai (Walapai) article (McGuire 1983), based on Dobyns and Euler (1970), groups Pai regional bands into three subtribes under the leadership of three subchiefs.