Wallace


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Related to Wallace: Alfred Russel Wallace, Wallace Line

Wal·lace

 (wŏl′ĭs), Alfred Russel 1823-1913.
British naturalist who developed a concept of evolution similar to that of Charles Darwin. He traveled in the Amazon region and the Malay Archipelago collecting specimens and wrote The Geographical Distribution of Animals (1876).

Wallace

, De Witt 1889-1981.
American publisher who with his wife Lila Bell Acheson Wallace (1889-1984) founded Reader's Digest in 1922.

Wallace

, George Corley 1919-1998.
American politician. A three-time governor of Alabama (1963-1967, 1971-1979, and 1983-1987), he first came to national attention as an outspoken segregationist. Wallace ran unsuccessfully for the presidency four times between 1964 and 1976.

Wallace

, Henry Agard 1888-1965.
Vice president of the United States (1941-1945) under Franklin D. Roosevelt. He ran for president in 1948 on the Progressive Party ticket.

Wallace

, Lewis Known as "Lew." 1827-1905.
American army officer, diplomat, and writer known especially for his novel Ben-Hur (1880).

Wallace

, Sir William 1272?-1305.
Scottish patriot who led resistance against the English and briefly gained control of Scotland (1297-1298) but was captured and executed for treason.

Wallace

(ˈwɒlɪs)
n
1. (Biography) Alfred Russel. 1823–1913, British naturalist, whose work on the theory of natural selection influenced Charles Darwin
2. (Biography) Edgar. 1875–1932, English crime novelist
3. (Biography) Sir Richard. 1818–90, English art collector and philanthropist. His bequest to the nation forms the Wallace Collection, London
4. (Biography) Sir William. ?1272–1305, Scottish patriot, who defeated the army of Edward I of England at Stirling (1297) but was routed at Falkirk (1298) and later executed

Wal•lace

(ˈwɒl ɪs, ˈwɔ lɪs)

n.
1. Alfred Russel, 1823–1913, English naturalist.
2. George Corley, 1919–98, U.S. politician.
3. Henry (Agard), 1888–1965, vice president of the U.S. 1941–45.
4. Lewis ( “Lew” ), 1827–1905, U.S. general and novelist.
5. Sir William, 1272?–1305, Scottish military leader and patriot.
6. (William Roy) DeWitt, 1889–1981, and his wife, Lila Bell (Acheson), 1889–1984, U.S. magazine publishers.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Wallace - Scottish insurgent who led the resistance to Edward IWallace - Scottish insurgent who led the resistance to Edward I; in 1297 he gained control of Scotland briefly until Edward invaded Scotland again and defeated Wallace and subsequently executed him (1270-1305)
2.Wallace - English writer noted for his crime novels (1875-1932)
3.Wallace - English naturalist who formulated a concept of evolution that resembled Charles Darwin's (1823-1913)Wallace - English naturalist who formulated a concept of evolution that resembled Charles Darwin's (1823-1913)
References in classic literature ?
But there was one man, Wallace, who was afraid of nothing.
As I was saying, Wallace--'King' Wallace we called him--was afraid of nothing alive or dead.
looked at King Wallace and King Wallace looked at her, while De Ville looked black.
Wallace, who is now studying the natural history of the Malay archipelago, has arrived at almost exactly the same general conclusions that I have on the origin of species.
And as he was in the Wallace country he wandered near and far exploring every spot where his hero might have been.
Wallace, Outlines of the Philosophy of Aristotle, 1875, 1880; A.
I can tell you about Richard Coeur-de-Lion and Saladin, and about William Wallace and Robert Bruce and James Douglas,--I know no end.
It was one of those clumsy, old-fashioned, English pieces known generally as Tower Hill muskets, and, for aught I know, might have been left on the island by Wallace, Carteret, Cook, or Vancouver.
Crookes and Wallace ranged up on the opposing side, while Sir Oliver Lodge attempted to formulate a compromise that would jibe with his particular cosmic theories.
They are very obliging, I'm sure," said Rose, whereat the "utility men" beamed with modest pride and resolved to enact Wallace and Montrose as soon as possible for their cousin's special benefit.
But does not Alfred Wallace relate in his famous book on the Malay Archipelago how, amongst the Aru Islanders, he discovered in an old and naked savage with a sooty skin a peculiar resemblance to a dear friend at home?
The object of my journey was to verify some conclusions of Wallace and of Bates, which could only be done by observing their reported facts under the same conditions in which they had themselves noted them.