Landor

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Landor

(ˈlændɔː)
n
(Biography) Walter Savage. 1775–1864, English poet, noted also for his prose works, including Imaginary Conversations (1824–29)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
The only thing that made life worth living was the thought of Walter Savage Landor, from whose IMAGINARY CONVERSATIONS she had promised to read at frequent intervals during the day.
(1778-1830), a romantically dogmatic but sympathetically appreciative critic; Thomas de Quincey (1785-1859), a capricious and voluminous author, master of a poetic prose style, best known for his 'Confessions of an English Opium-Eater'; Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864), the best nineteenth century English representative, both in prose and in lyric verse, of the pure classical spirit, though his own temperament was violently romantic; Thomas Love Peacock (1785-1866), author of some delightful satirical and humorous novels, of which 'Maid Marian' anticipated 'Ivanhoe'; and Miss Mary Russell Mitford (1787-1855), among whose charming prose sketches of country life 'Our Village' is best and best-known.
- Walter Savage Landor, 19th century English writer and poet.
Walter Savage Landor an English writer says we talk on principle, but we act on interest.
But no mention of the stuff, not even on the tomb of Rose Aylmer, symbol of suffering memsahibdom, who is said to have succumbed to a "surfeit of pineapples" and whose epitaph was penned by Walter Savage Landor: "Ah, what avails the sceptred race/ Ah, what the form divine/ What every virtue, every grace!/ Rose Aylmer, all were thine."
Astbury's Five Warwick Poets (Greville Press Pamplets: PS7.50) ranges from the Elizabethan, Fulke Greville (who I always cared for) to Philip Larkin's Sad Steps: 'Groping back to bed after a piss...' etc It's a small but vivid selection which also has verse by Walter Savage Landor and John Masefield who, as we all know, as well as being a poet was involved with Sir Barry Jackson in the creating of the original Birmingham Rep.
A century earlier, 19th-century poet Walter Savage Landor famously declared Swansea Bay to be better both than the Bay of Naples and its less well-known neighbour the Gulf of Salerno Similarly, Neath-born mezzo-soprano Katherine Jenkins described Three Cliffs Bay on Swansea's Gower Peninsula as giving her "the feeling of being hugged".
It is a play of its time with a living room set, the char providing comic relief, a ponderous detective, a much mentioned poetic quotation from the now little known Walter Savage Landor and lots of earnest debate.
Walter Savage Landor (1775-1864) was a celebrated English poet who wrote many poems in Latin, and Rudd was dissatisfied with the modern editions and translations, the most reputable of which, two massive volumes, was too expensive for almost anyone to buy.
Unsurprisingly, the version of Catullus 20 by Swinburne's idol Walter Savage Landor would sound even more familiar: In spring the many-colour'd crown, The sheafs in summer, ruddy-brown, The autumn's twisting tendrils green, With nectar-gushing grapes between, Some pink, some purple, some bright gold, Then shrivel'd olive, blue with cold, Are all for me.
In fact, the first sentence of the latest one plainly states a variant of the same essential agenda: "In this study, I consider how dramas by Joanna Baillie, novels by Walter Scott and Imaginary Conversations by Walter Savage Landor perform a kind of social work comparable to the work undertaken by Jane Addams and other 'Settlers' who developed an interventionist sociology in the pre-disciplinary era before theory and practice were separated" (7).
Rhiannon Daniels's study of marginalia and other paratextual evidence reveals the reception and readership of early printed editions of the Decameron; Guyda Armstrong's essay casts much light on the English engagement with Boccaccio's works from the fourteenth to the sixteenth centuries, revealing that Boccaccio's reception is shaped by cultural fads (Petrarchism, etc.), the particular needs of a given reader or readership, and the mediation of French translations; Martin McLaughlin's essay addresses issues of interpretation and originality in Beroaldo's Latin translation of Decameron 10.8; and Jonathan Usher's lively piece on Walter Savage Landor snatches from oblivion's maw one of Boccaccio's most ardent, eccentric, and outspoken English admirers.