WPB

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WPB

or

wpb

abbreviation for
(Furniture) waste paper basket
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References in periodicals archive ?
The War Production Board was beginning to question agreements where one publisher acted as the exclusive distributor for books published by another.
Facing shortages, the War Production Board turned to the nation's ladies.
(All of the latter were top staff members of the War Production Board.) In the middle, initially leaning either one way or the other, toward the military or toward the economists, were Donald Nelson (Chairman of wpb), Vice President Henry Wallace, General George Marshall (chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff), Harry Hopkins (special assistant to the president), Charles Wilson (vice chairman of wpb, formerly ceo of General Motors, and a subsequent secretary of defense), Ferdinand Eberstadt (also a vice chairman of wpb), Leon Henderson (administrator of the Office of Price Administration), and other luminaries of the time.
THE WAR PRODUCTION Board (WPB), meanwhile, possessed broad powers to direct the flow of capital investment, allocate war contracts, spur regional economic development, and subsidize technological innovation.
As pre-WWII defense industrial capacity increased, the responsibility to manage and prioritize resources and raw materials to support the war effort fell on the War Production Board (WPB).
War Production Board 1945, 7, 32) also diminished the productivity of the additional hours worked in manufacturing.
Many of the graduates were transferred to the War Production Board when it was formed in 1942.
At issue was an order from the government's Office of Production Management, shortly to become the War Production Board, mandating severe restrictions on nickel and chrome, which were used in appliances made of iron, steel and wire.
During WWII, he worked for the War Production Board in Washington D.C., and after the war as a reporter and editor of the Amsterdam News, an African American newspaper in New York.
The amount of film available to Hollywood was cut by about 25 per cent and the War Production Board issued a decree limiting the use of new materials for stage sets to $5,000 per picture.
In 1943, the War Production Board (WPB), which regulated production of civilian goods and oversaw the conversion of industries, limited jewelers to 50 per cent of the gold they used in 1941.