wardriving

(redirected from War driving)
Also found in: Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to War driving: Bluejacking, piggybacking
Translations

wardriving

n (Comput, Telec) → Wardriving nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Yemen's government has been pitched against the Iran-aligned Houthi movement since 2015 in a war driving the country to the verge of famine.
She became second-in-command of the Calais Convoy in late 1915 and spent the rest of the war driving ambulances and improving conditions for the wounded on the Western Front.
He already has the police shooting up a drug war driving up fear in the street.
MODI- NITISH HOARDING WAR DRIVING through the streets of Patna one is overwhelmed by the sheer number of political hoardings that dominate the capital's skyline.
Harry talks movingly of his service as a leading aircraftsman in the RAF during the Second World War driving crash vehicles to help returning bomber crews.
The women were provoked at the time by the sight of US female soldiers who were taking part in the first Gulf War driving military vehicles freely in their own country while they are banned.
He says:"I remember after the war driving down the drive and seeing this house with these great big lamps on either side which were shining in the dark.
"Instead, he saw out the war driving lorries around Gloucestershire for the war effort.
The Times said Gonzalez and his associates drove around and scanned the wireless networks of retailers to find security holes in the networks, known as "war driving," according to prosecutors.
I've read about lots of accidents happening during the blackout when people were driving around bumping into each other, but I've never seen anything about people spending the war driving around and around trying to find their way home.
"It is an area of developing technology to detect and protect personal computers and business computer networks from assaults such as war driving, computer corruption, unwanted portal entry and Trojans, among other dangers." For those not fluent in tech talk, "war driving" means using a wireless Internet connection to steal an open network line, and is often done by sitting in a vehicle near the computer site.