Vietnam War

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Vietnam War

n.
A protracted military conflict (1954-1975) between South Vietnam, supported by United States forces, and Communist North Vietnam. The war resulted in a North Vietnamese victory and unification of Vietnam under Communist rule.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Vietnam War - a prolonged war (1954-1975) between the communist armies of North Vietnam who were supported by the Chinese and the armies of South Vietnam who were supported by the United StatesVietnam War - a prolonged war (1954-1975) between the communist armies of North Vietnam who were supported by the Chinese and the armies of South Vietnam who were supported by the United States
Annam, Socialist Republic of Vietnam, Viet Nam, Vietnam - a communist state in Indochina on the South China Sea; achieved independence from France in 1945
Translations
Vietnamkrieg
References in periodicals archive ?
She had just spent the night with thousands of other students, crammed into auditoria and huddled on the snowy crossroads of campus, learning about the war in Vietnam.
By 1966, inspired by the civil rights movement and hardening antipathy toward the war in Vietnam, student activists were challenging Stanford on many fronts.
The war in Vietnam ended with a public fed up with war.
By his account, McNamara applied the "lessons" of Cuba--whatever they may have been--to the war in Vietnam, a culture about which our government knew absolutely nothing.
ground war in Vietnam was sputtering to an end, "354,000 men had entered the Services under the program, according to the congressional testimony of Wayne S.
So Cornell wrote his draft board in hopes that they might kindly send him "duplicates," and in the process enable him to destroy them in a ceremony he believed would convey his religious and civic objections to the draft and the war in Vietnam.
It was arguably Ellsberg's greatest triumph: He had roused the self-destructive impulses of a president and an administration that he felt had betrayed the American people by allowing the war in Vietnam to continue.
The two books together give an accurate view of how young Americans were affected by the war in Vietnam, how they longed for peace, how they became disillusioned with the government and with those in authority.
The first deals with the war in Vietnam, and the second deals with the war's effects in the United States.