Iraq War

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Iraq War

n.
A protracted military conflict in Iraq that began in 2003 with an attack by a coalition of forces led by the United States and that resulted in the overthrow of Saddam Hussein's regime. US combat troops were withdrawn in 2010.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Behind the war on Iraq. Monthly Review, 55(1), 20-49.
Weapons of Mass Deception: The Uses of Propaganda in Bush's War on Iraq, by Sheldon Rampton and John Stauber, New York: J.P.
Bush has explicitly said on scores of occasions, the war on Iraq is intended to validate the UN's authority and prestige by enforcing its disarmament decrees.
Perhaps the implication here is that the Bush administration's war on Iraq was, in fact, something more than the campaign for oil that it was criticized to be.
Bush advertised the war on Iraq as a war against terror, but it may serve to swell the ranks of the terrorists.
and Britain to reverse their decision to wage war on Iraq. Foreseeing disastrous consequences not only in Iraq but throughout the region, they also asked the Iraqis to participate in "an all-out effort to avoid war and prevent untold sufferings for millions of innocent people" (Jan 21/03).
Reiterating a familiar Bush administration theme, Rice placed the war on Iraq in the context of 9-11, which she said represented "one of the relatively rare earthquakes that cause lasting tectonic shifts in international politics...."
But Bush's attitude toward the United Nations became altogether clear on September 12 when he told the United Nations that it must go along with his war on Iraq or render itself "irrelevant."
The government of British Prime Minister Tony Blair, which eagerly supported the war on Iraq, has also claimed that the search for Iraqi WMDs will take time.
In their heart of hearts, the American people do not want war on Iraq. The American people want peace.
By launching an aggressive war on Iraq to enforce UN disarmament decrees, our nation has--at very least--reached the "threshold" described by Bloomfield, and while we may not have crossed the Rubicon, we have at very least wet our feet therein.
What is missing is what an American war on Iraq will do to tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of ordinary human beings who are not concerned with geopolitics and military strategy, and who just want their children to live, to grow up.