War to End War


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Noun1.War to End War - a war between the allies (Russia, France, British Empire, Italy, United States, Japan, Rumania, Serbia, Belgium, Greece, Portugal, Montenegro) and the Central Powers (Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey, Bulgaria) from 1914 to 1918War to End War - a war between the allies (Russia, France, British Empire, Italy, United States, Japan, Rumania, Serbia, Belgium, Greece, Portugal, Montenegro) and the Central Powers (Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey, Bulgaria) from 1914 to 1918
Battle of the Marne, Belleau Wood, Chateau-Thierry, Marne River - a World War I battle in northwestern France where the Allies defeated the Germans in 1918
battle of Caporetto, Caporetto - battle of World War I (1917); Italians were defeated by the Austrian and German forces
Dardanelles campaign, Dardanelles - the unsuccessful campaign in World War I (1915) by the English and French to open a passage for aid to Russia; defeated by the Turks
battle of Jutland, Jutland - an indecisive naval battle in World War I (1916); fought between the British and German fleets off the northwestern coast of Denmark
Argonne, Argonne Forest, Meuse-Argonne, Meuse-Argonne operation, Meuse, Meuse River - an American operation in World War I (1918); American troops under Pershing drove back the German armies which were saved only by the armistice on November 11
battle of Soissons-Reims, battle of the Aisne, battle of the Chemin-des-Dames, Soissons - a battle in World War I (May 1918); the Germans tried to attack before the American numbers were too great to defeat; the tactical success of the Germans proved to be a strategic failure
Battle of the Somme, Somme, Somme River - battle in World War I (1916)
battle of Tannenberg, Tannenberg - a battle in World War I (1914); decisive German victory over the Russians
battle of Verdun, Verdun - a battle in World War I (1916); in some of the bloodiest fighting in World War I the German offensive was stopped
first battle of Ypres, Ypres, battle of Ypres - battle in World War I (1914); heavy but indecisive fighting as the Allies and the Germans both tried to break through the lines of the others
second battle of Ypres, Ypres, battle of Ypres - battle in World War I (1915); Germans wanted to try chlorine (a toxic yellow gas) as a weapon and succeeded in taking considerable territory from the Allied salient
battle of Ypres, third battle of Ypres, Ypres - battle in World War I (1917); an Allied offensive which eventually failed because tanks bogged down in the waterlogged soil of Flanders; Germans introduced mustard gas which interfered with the Allied artillery
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The war to end war had no lasting good effects that came close to its bad ones.
Wells wrote, "the war to end war," a later generation hoped the antibiotics developed in the 1930s and 1940s would eradicate many diseases once and for all.
As the big audience at the 'Mem' indicated, there is still a fascination with the 'war to end war' and the 100th anniversaries are piling up like spent shell cases.
From 1914 to 1918 many nations were engulfed in a conflict that cost millions their lives, which was later referred to as The First World War, The Great War and 'The War To End War' (taken from an article published by H.G.
Wells used the expression, "the war to end war," in In the Fourth Year (1918), where he noted that the locution had "got into circulation" in the second half of 1914.
Each war and battle was said to be, like British writer H G Wells wrote in 1914, the war to end war. Peace brings a lot of uplifting gain to people occupying a peaceful land, but the unfortunate fact remains that war is a multi-trillion dollar industry and power is a powerful addictive drug.
After World War I, the British field marshal Archibald Wavell presciently observed that, "After 'the war to end war,'" the victors "seem to have been pretty successful in Paris at making a 'Peace to end Peace.'" He foresaw what now seems obvious: the imposition of artificial arrangements in the Middle East would only engender conflict.
The author quotes Archibald Wavell, a then officer in the British Army (later Field Marshall) who participated in Allenby's campaign on Palestine, who said, "After 'the war to end war', they seem to have been pretty successful in Paris at making 'a peace to end peace'." This suggests that a review of historical documents reveals that the psychological aspect of peoples and rulers has always been an influential factor in the historic cycle of political events." Consequently, people of the region and their rulers were not subjected to the psychological pressures and political complexities that emanated from colonial and mandate rule.