First Amendment

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First′ Amend′ment


n.
an amendment to the U.S. Constitution, prohibiting Congress from interfering with freedom of religion, speech, assembly, or petition.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.First Amendment - an amendment to the Constitution of the United States guaranteeing the right of free expression; includes freedom of assembly and freedom of the press and freedom of religion and freedom of speech
Bill of Rights - a statement of fundamental rights and privileges (especially the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution)
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
References in periodicals archive ?
Justice Alito's opinion seems safer; it is more respectful of the Warren era and the public's still-potent belief that the Warren Court decisions ushered in a new and continuing jurisprudence based on the protection of individual rights.
Like previous courts, the fractious Warren court that decided Brown made every effort to connect itself to existing law, and so it cast itself, as had courts before and after it, in the role of extending or filling in existing principles of law.
But the idea persists, even among those who are sympathetic to the results that the Warren Court reached, that what the Warren Court was doing was somehow not really law: that the Warren Court "made it up," and that the important Warren Court decisions cannot be justified by reference to conventional legal materials.
And since England has no written constitution, the government is able to jettison civil liberties to a far greater extent than American critics of the Warren court ever dreamed.
The most famous case of the Warren Court was Brown v.
The late University of Chicago law professor Philip Kurland once remarked that "if the road to hell is paved with good intentions, then the Warren Court was greatest roadbuilder of all time.
He kept Truman out of the steel mills, argued that the Bill of Rights should protect individual freedoms against state government action in areas where it had only applied to the federal government, and later in his career tried to restrain certain overreaching excesses of the Warren Court.
Last night, Mr Graham, a film and media production student, of Windsor Gardens, Mr Flannery, 19, a chimney flue fitter, of Madeira Avenue, both Whitley Bay, and Mr Hindmarsh, 34, of Warren Court, Ashington, were rewarded with scrolls from the Royal Humane Society.
Nixon who was put on the court in part to roll back the progressive views of the Earl Warren court, penned a bitter dissent to a school prayer case in which he attacked Everson's reasoning.
1) In addition to Miranda and other deterrents largely derived from the Fifth Amendment, the Warren Court majority completed much of the incorporation or absorption of the Bill of Rights, making most federal criminal safeguards applicable to the states.