waterway

(redirected from Waterways)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

wa·ter·way

 (wô′tər-wā′, wŏt′ər-)
n.
1. A navigable body of water, such as a river, channel, or canal.
2. A channel at the edge of a ship's deck to drain away water.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

waterway

(ˈwɔːtəˌweɪ)
n
(Civil Engineering) a river, canal, or other navigable channel used as a means of travel or transport
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

wa•ter•way

(ˈwɔ tərˌweɪ, ˈwɒt ər-)

n.
a river, canal, or other body of water serving as a route or way of travel or transport.
[before 950]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.waterway - a navigable body of waterwaterway - a navigable body of water    
body of water, water - the part of the earth's surface covered with water (such as a river or lake or ocean); "they invaded our territorial waters"; "they were sitting by the water's edge"
ditch - any small natural waterway
mare clausum - (closed sea) a navigable body of water under the jurisdiction of a single nation
mare liberum - (free sea) a navigable body of water to which all nations have equal access
rapid - a part of a river where the current is very fast
2.waterway - a conduit through which water flowswaterway - a conduit through which water flows
canal - long and narrow strip of water made for boats or for irrigation
flume - watercourse that consists of an open artificial chute filled with water for power or for carrying logs
headrace - a waterway that feeds water to a mill or water wheel or turbine
tailrace - a watercourse that carries water away from a mill or water wheel or turbine
way - any artifact consisting of a road or path affording passage from one place to another; "he said he was looking for the way out"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
مَجْرى مائي
sejlløb
vízi út
skipgengt fljót; skipaskurîur
vodná cesta
kanalsu yolu

waterway

[ˈwɔːtəweɪ] Nvía f fluvial or navegable; (= inland waterway) → canal m (navegable)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

waterway

[ˈwɔːtərweɪ] ncours m d'eau navigablewater wheel waterwheel [ˈwɔːtərhwiːl] nturbine f hydraulique
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

waterway

[ˈwɔːtəˌweɪ] ncorso d'acqua navigabile
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

water

(ˈwoːtə) noun
a colourless, transparent liquid compound of hydrogen and oxygen, having no taste or smell, which turns to steam when boiled and to ice when frozen. She drank two glasses of water; `Are you going swimming in the sea?' `No, the water's too cold'; Each bedroom in the hotel is supplied with hot and cold running water; (also adjective) The plumber had to turn off the water supply in order to repair the pipe; transport by land and water.
verb
1. to supply with water. He watered the plants.
2. (of the mouth) to produce saliva. His mouth watered at the sight of all the food.
3. (of the eyes) to fill with tears. The dense smoke made his eyes water.
ˈwaters noun plural
a body of water such as the sea, a river etc. the stormy waters of the bay.
ˈwatery adjective
1. like water; diluted. a watery fluid.
2. (of eyes) full of fluid eg because of illness, cold winds etc.
3. (of a colour) pale. eyes of a watery blue.
ˈwateriness noun

water boatman

a water insect with oarlike back legs that propel it through the water.
ˈwaterborne adjective
carried or transmitted by water. Typhoid is a waterborne disease.
ˈwater-closet noun
(abbreviation WC (dabljuˈsiː) ) a lavatory.
ˈwater-colour noun
a type of paint which is thinned with water instead of with oil.
ˈwatercress noun
a herb which grows in water and is often used in salads.
ˈwaterfall noun
a natural fall of water from a height such as a rock or a cliff.
ˈwaterfowl noun or noun plural
a bird or birds which live on or beside water.
ˈwaterfront noun
that part of a town etc which faces the sea or a lake. He lives on the waterfront.
ˈwaterhole noun
a spring or other place where water can be found in a desert or other dry country. The elephant drank from the waterhole.
ˈwatering-can noun
a container used when watering plants.
water level
the level of the surface of a mass of water. The water level in the reservoir is sinking/rising.
ˈwaterlilyplural ˈwaterlilies noun
a water plant with broad flat floating leaves.
ˈwaterlogged adjective
(of ground) soaked in water.
water main
a large underground pipe carrying a public water supply.
ˈwater-melon
a type of melon with green skin and red flesh.
ˈwaterproof adjective
not allowing water to soak through. waterproof material.
noun
a coat made of waterproof material. She was wearing a waterproof.
verb
to make (material) waterproof.
ˈwatershed noun
an area of high land from which rivers flow in different directions into different basins.
ˈwater-skiing noun
the sport of skiing on water, towed by a motor-boat.
ˈwater-ski verb
ˈwatertight adjective
made in such a way that water cannot pass through.
water vapour
water in the form of a gas, produced by evaporation.
ˈwaterway noun
a channel, eg a canal or river, along which ships can sail.
ˈwaterwheel noun
a wheel moved by water to work machinery etc.
ˈwaterworks noun singular or plural
a place in which water is purified and stored before distribution to an area.
hold water
to be convincing. His explanation won't hold water.
in(to) deep water
in(to) trouble or danger. I got into deep water during that argument.
water down
to dilute. This milk has been watered down.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
There were Emperors beloved of literary men, Emperors beloved of the people, builders of long waterways and glittering palaces, and one great conqueror, the Emperor Wu Ti, of almost legendary fame.
All that night we raced through the Barsoomian void, passing over low hills and dead sea bottoms; above long-deserted cities and populous centers of red Martian habitation upon the ribbon-like lines of cultivated land which border the globe-encircling waterways, which Earth men call the canals of Mars.
Men were at work here and there--for it was the season for "taking up" the meadows, or digging the little waterways clear for the winter irrigation, and mending their banks where trodden down by the cows.
The vegetation was similar to that which covers the lawns of the red Martians of the great waterways, but the trees and birds were unlike anything that I had ever seen upon Mars, and then through the further trees I could see that most un-Martian of all sights--an open sea, its blue waters shimmering beneath the brazen sun.
Dark spruce forest frowned on either side the frozen waterway. The trees had been stripped by a recent wind of their white covering of frost, and they seemed to lean towards each other, black and ominous, in the fading light.
It provided a means of getting to the Severn, round which lay the great Roman roads then coming into existence, and made possible the great waterway to the heart of England--through the Severn and its tributaries.
The labour of the imperial waterway goes on from generation to generation, goes on day and night.
They know that I am the daughter of ten thousand jeddaks, that I trace my ancestry straight back without a break to the builder of the first great waterway, and they, who do not even know their own mothers, are jealous of me.
"That used to be the principal waterway from Burnham village.
The sea-reach of the Thames stretched before us like the beginning of an interminable waterway. In the offing the sea and the sky were welded together without a joint, and in the luminous space the tanned sails of the barges drifting up with the tide seemed to stand still in red clusters of canvas sharply peaked, with gleams of varnished sprits.
The surface of the valley was dotted with enormous trees, a strange sight so far from a Martian waterway. The ground itself was clothed in brilliant scarlet sward, picked out with innumerable patches of gorgeous wild flowers.
I had to admit the wisdom of his advice, but the desire to explore this great waterway was strong upon me, arousing in me at last a determination to make the attempt after first gaining the mainland and rectify-ing our deficiencies.