Watteau


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Wat·teau

 (wŏ-tō′, vä-), Jean Antoine 1684-1721.
French painter noted for his exuberant scenes of gallantry, such as The Embarkation for Cythera (1717).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Watteau

(ˈwɒtəʊ; French vato)
n
(Biography) Jean-Antoine (ʒɑ̃ ɑ̃twan). 1684–1721, French painter, esp of fêtes champêtres
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Wat•teau

(wɒˈtoʊ, vɑ-)

n.
Jean Antoine, 1684–1721, French painter.

Wat•teau

(wɒˈtoʊ, vɑ-)
adj.
1. designating the loose, full back of a woman's gown, formed by wide box pleats extending from shoulder to hem in an unbroken line.
2. designating a low-crowned straw hat with the brim turned up at the back and trimmed with flowers.
[alluding to articles of clothing depicted in paintings by J. A. Watteau]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Watteau - French painter (1684-1721)Watteau - French painter (1684-1721)    
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References in classic literature ?
The ladies of Watteau, gay and insouciant, seemed to wander with their cavaliers among the great trees, whispering to one another careless, charming things, and yet somehow oppressed by a nameless fear.
Her shoes were of the sort called "Watteau." And her heels were of the height at which men shudder, and ask themselves (in contemplating an otherwise lovable woman), "Can this charming person straighten her knees?"
Reclining shepherds and shepherdesses in Watteau costume, with their dogs and their sheep, formed the adornments of the pedestal.
For some reason it looked a very artificial lake; indeed, the whole scene was like a classical landscape with a touch of Watteau; the Palladian facade of the house pale in the moon, and the same silver touching the very pagan and naked marble nymph in the middle of the pond.
He was trapped as if by magic into a garden of troubadours, a Watteau fairyland; and, willing to shake off such amorous imbecilities by speech, he stepped briskly after his enemy.
Coincidentally, another instrument seen in Watteau paintings, as well as in "La Fete a Venise," serves as an objective correlative to the central idea of "cover story." In the description of the spurious painting, the instrument known as the "musette de cour," a small bagpipe popular in France in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, ingeniously symbolizes the cover story.
A dramatic chapel-length Watteau train extended from the empire waist, and attention was drawn to the hemline by the vintage-inspired scalloped lace edging.
Most of the paintings--excepting "Watteau" (2007) and "Merlin" (2011)--are formatted vertically.
As an example of the barely relevant, we read that in 1721 "the painter Antoine Watteau died in Nogentsur-Marme, Ile-de-France" (p.
Complementing the current Watteau exhibition at the Royal Academy, this two-part display presents both the Wallace Collection's Watteau holdings and explores the artist's close ties with a prominent dealer in his work the great 18th-century French collector and taste-maker Jean de Jullienne (1686-1766) his career and collections.
Rococo style is described through excellent illustrations and a clearly written text: deliberately curving forms, pastel colors and a lighthearted mood, as seen in French architecture and interior design, and the paintings of Jean-Antoine Watteau and Francois Boucher.
"Turner And The Masters", also featuring works by Watteau, Titian, Poussin and Rubens, opens in February at the Grand Palais before going to the Museo del Prado in Madrid from June.