corporate welfare

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corporate welfare

n.
Financial aid, such as a subsidy or tax break, provided by a government to corporations or other businesses, especially when viewed as wasteful or unjust: "critics who say that letting big companies raise private stock on public land amounts to corporate welfare" (Frank Clifford).

cor′porate wel′fare


n.
financial assistance, as tax breaks or subsidies, given by the government esp. to large companies.
[1990–95, Amer.]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Tories live in terror of Labour's socialist leader, petrified his creation of a fairer country would announce the end of their selfish privileged wealthfare.
Their CFOs are living it up on the Italian Riviera, spending their corporate "wealthfare." Why doesn't the government do something?
Most direct spending programs benefit lower-class individuals, in contrast to the middle- and upper-class "wealthfare" orientation of tax expenditures.
The list was endorsed by the Coalition on Human Needs, the National Education Association, the Center for Community Change, the Community Nutrition Institute, Common Cause, Tax Watch, and the Corporate Wealthfare Project, among others.
Shields is a researcher and coordinator of the Corporate Wealthfare Project & TaxWatch.
Wealthfare -- the money we hand out to corporations and wealthy individuals -- costs us at least $448 billion a year.
Even within categories we cite figures for, there are often additional wealthfare expenses we haven't been able to nail down.
The flab laid bare in 23 snappy chapters categorizing $448 billion in "Wealthfare" or "the money we hand out to corporations and wealthy individuals," is shocking enough to create one of the most critical groundswells of citizens outrange in the history of the United States.
This equation is so lopsided, the authors insist, that even if a wave of conversion were to sweep through Washington, convincing policymakers to slash perks, and pork to the wealthy by 75 percent, "welfare for the rich would still cost almost as much each year as the federal deficit." In short, wealthfare presently amounts to three-and-a-half times more than the $130 billion spent on welfare for the poor, and a mere reduction of the pork by 26 percent would allow Congress to eliminate the deficit without further exacerbating homelessness and poverty.
No wonder pressure's growing for middle-class handouts to be scrapped and a windfall tax on housebuilders who grew rich on wealthfare state benefits.
Tory Controller Chris Grayling's signalling of a couple of billion for a pair of runaway tycoons is wealthfare for a super-rich few - with the many picking up the tab.
Wealthfare for the well-off has escaped austerity, with subsidies to private landlords doubling to PS9.3billion during a decade in which few council homes were built.