weblish


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weblish

(ˈwɛblɪʃ)
n
(Computer Science) informal the shorthand form of English that is used in text messaging, chat rooms, etc
[C20: web (sense 14) + (Eng)lish]
References in periodicals archive ?
Ahora bien, Crystal (2002) habla de Netspeak (ciberhabla), ciberlenguaje, entre otras denominaciones, tal y como indica Thurlow (2001): "Weblish, netlingo, e-talk, tech-speak, wired-style, geek-speak, netspeak and so on are all terms used popularly to describe the sort of language and communication in the different channels (or 'niches') of the internet (or net): emails, chatrooms, bulletin boards, newsgroups, websites, and 'virtual words' [...]" (p.
Various technical and popular suggestions have been made, such as cyberspeak, electronic discourse, Netlish, Weblish, and Netspeak.
Among their topics are English-Russian learner's lexicography in the 16th to 21st centuries, a new generation of specialized dictionaries to Shakespeare's work, gender nominations of people as viewed lexicographically, documenting a section of the mosaic of South African English, the Anichkov theory of idiomatics and bilingual dictionaries of idioms and cliches, the systematization and typology of terms in Weblish, terminology of the European Union challenging the terminological and terminographic principles, phonetic terminology as a representation of a special subject sphere, and terms in colloquial use.
ushers in bangin', weblish,SARS,Al-Qaida, and naturally,Puh-leeze.
The latest Collins English Dictionary contains vile examples of weblish like CYA (see ya); GAL (get a life) and WANT2TLK (want to talk?).
Text message and email shorthand becomes Weblish, with words including 'CUL8R', 'LUV', 'GR8', and 2WAN2TALK'.
His selection of this term clearly arises from the ephemeral neologisms common to digital culture in the mid and late 1990s, evidence for which resides in the list of alternatives he considered--"netlish," "weblish," and "cyberspeak." Though it is a small critique, this text would be improved should he have selected a less quaint term such as simply "computer-mediated communication" (CMC) or "electronic discourse." This small problem aside, Crystal convincingly describes language use and language change within "Internet situations" such as e-mail, synchronous and asynchronous "chat groups" (his term), virtual worlds (MUDs and MOOs), and the World Wide Web.
Millions of people around the world now communicate in a speedy and shortened version of English, nicknamed Weblish.
WEBLISH is the abbreviated internet and text message language and compounds such as GR0 and WAN2TLK are now instantly recognised abbreviations by many.
The year 2003 ushers in bangin', weblish,SARS,Al-Qaida, and naturally,Puh-leeze.