Week-end


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Week´-end´


n.1.The end of the week, usually comprising the period from Friday evening to Monday morning, observed commonly as a period of respite from work or school; as, to visit one for a week-end; also, a house party during a week-end. Contrasted to work days.
References in classic literature ?
"Guess I'll go down an' get a glass of beer," Joe said, in the queer, monotonous tones that marked his week-end collapse.
A fifth week passed, and a sixth, during which he lived and toiled as a machine, with just a spark of something more in him, just a glimmering bit of soul, that compelled him, at each week-end, to scorch off the hundred and forty miles.
Every Friday afternoon one of the hired men from the farm drove into Winesburg and took her home for the week-end, so that she did not spend the Saturday holiday with the town people.
On the Friday evening before, as she was being driven back to the farm for the week-end by one of the hired men, she had on an impulse done a thing that had startled her, and as John Hardy stood in the darkness below and called her name softly and insis- tently, she walked about in her room and wondered what new impulse had led her to commit so ridicu- lous an act.
I said that I did not like to leave my mother, on which he suggested that I should go home to her every week-end, and he offered me a hundred a year, which was certainly splendid pay.
The landlord further informed me that there are usually week-end visitors--`a warm lot, sir'--at the Hall, and especially one gentleman with a red moustache, Mr.
"Well, I happen to know that she's not above going to Eastbourne with a man for the week-end now and again.
On one such week-end visit, Holdsworthy let him in on a good thing, a good little thing, a brickyard at Glen Ellen.
Between the two of us, in fact, our friend Stefano seemed tolerably certain of a warm week-end.
Would it not serve them jolly well right if they came back and found that their parents were spending the week-end in the country?
Fyne used to impart to him piecemeal when he came down to spend his week-ends gravely with her and the children.
"In the course of conversation they said that they wanted a country cottage--the father to live there, the son to run down for week-ends. I thought, 'What a chance of scoring off Sir Harry!' and I took their address and a London reference, found they weren't actual blackguards--it was great sport--and wrote to him, making out--"