silver birch

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Related to Weeping Birch: weeping beech

silver birch

n
(Plants) a betulaceous tree, Betula pendula, of N temperate regions of the Old World, having silvery-white peeling bark. See also birch1
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.silver birch - European birch with silvery white peeling bark and markedly drooping branchessilver birch - European birch with silvery white peeling bark and markedly drooping branches
Betula, genus Betula - a genus of trees of the family Betulaceae (such as birches)
birch tree, birch - any betulaceous tree or shrub of the genus Betula having a thin peeling bark
Translations

silver birch

nbetulla argentata or bianca
References in classic literature ?
For instance, hay-ricks in the trees, and here and there very beautiful masses of weeping birch, their white stems shining like silver through the delicate green of the leaves.
What happy hours Mary and I have passed while sitting at our work by the fire, or wandering on the heath-clad hills, or idling under the weeping birch (the only considerable tree in the garden), talking of future happiness to ourselves and our parents, of what we would do, and see, and possess; with no firmer foundation for our goodly superstructure than the riches that were expected to flow in upon us from the success of the worthy merchant's speculations.
When it is mature, its branches hang gracefully, giving it the title weeping birch.
The gardens have been much improved by the owners, boasting a colourful array of flora, including roses, rhododendrons, acers, catalpa trees, persimmon, bamboo, weeping willow, weeping birch, viburnum, laburnum and clematis.
A weeping birch planted just outside the high window will eventually block the view from the street, allowing muted light to filter through the leaves.
We have all seen weeping birch and many paper birch slowly thin out at their top and then die.
It is less colourful than those flowers-and-fruit choices, but is far superior to the better-known weeping birch, `Youngii', with a gentle, weeping habit and delicate, ferny foliage that turns yellow in autumn.
Eye rifling through the stand of transplanted weeping birch against the ravaged elm and red pine used for pulp and paneling, I come to leached soil and trash, clutter, and city paper - the stories breaking into black and white patterns on the page.