Weill


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Weill

 (wīl, vīl), Kurt 1900-1950.
German-born composer who collaborated with Bertolt Brecht on The Threepenny Opera (1928) and The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny (1930).

Weill

(vaɪl)
n
(Biography) Kurt (kʊrt). 1900–50, German composer, in the US from 1935. He wrote the music for Brecht's The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny (1927) and The Threepenny Opera (1928)

Weill

(waɪl, vaɪl)

n.
Kurt, 1900–50, German composer, in the U.S. after 1935.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Weill - German composerWeill - German composer; collaborated with Bertolt Brecht (1900-1950)
References in periodicals archive ?
Mark Veich, an accomplished leader in institutional advancement, has been appointed vice provost for external affairs at Weill Cornell Medicine, effective Feb.
M2 EQUITYBITES-February 16, 2017-Boehringer Ingelheim and Weill Cornell Medicine sign COPD research deal
M2 PHARMA-February 16, 2017-Boehringer Ingelheim and Weill Cornell Medicine sign COPD research deal
Jack Resnick & Sons signed a 15-year, 10,547 s/flease with Weill Cornell Medicine, on a portion of the fifth floor of 255 Greenwich Street.
RAHUL SHARMA, MD, MBA, CPE, FACEP, is now emergency physician-in-chief for the division of emergency medicine and an associate professor at Weill Cornell Medicine.
Consider agent Gregory Weill, co-founder of Paris-based agency Adequat, as the French Ari Gold.
Sandy" Weill will serve as chairman of Hamilton Insurance Group, Ltd.
Global Banking News-September 10, 2013--Sandy Weill says no break up of banks needed if regulations are proper(C)2013 ENPublishing - http://www.
Building on his 1990 Cambridge opera handbook on Kurt Weill's Threepenny Opera, his critical edition of that work, and numerous essays on Weill, Stephen Hinton presents in Weill's Musical Theater: Stages of Reform for the first time a musicological study of all of Weill's works for the stage.
Starting after his 1955 graduation from Cornell, Weill started at Bear Stearns and then fell in with a group of partners who took over smaller trading houses, ultimately becoming Shearson Loeb Rhoades by 1974.
This separation, of course, was the prime purpose of the Glass-Steagall Act of 1933, a piece of legislation that Weill and other bankers had watered down, with Alan Greenspan's support, before Weill helped engineer its official demise in 1999.