Roosevelt Island

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Roosevelt Island

1. An island in the East River off the coast of central Manhattan Island. It was long the site of a penal institution and municipal hospital, which earned it the name Welfare Island after 1921. Renamed for Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1973, it is now largely residential.
2. An island of Antarctica in the eastern part of the Ross Ice Shelf. Robert E. Byrd discovered the island in 1934.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
It discusses the political imagination, small pockets of resistance and deep foundational roots, and resilience in Ariel Dorfman's Other Septembers, Many Americas and Manifesto for Another World, Goshka Macuga's The Nature of the Beast, Julia de Burgos' poems from Welfare Island, Pablo Neruda's Alturas de Macchu Picchu, Martin Espada's The Republic of Poetry, Gabriel Garcia Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude, Subcomandate Marcos' "The Southeast in Two Winds," Comandata Esther's 2001 speech to the Congress of the Union, and Kerry Kennedy's Speak Truth to Power.
In 2012, a populist, top-rating current affairs program in a facile report portrayed Home Island as an 'Idyllic Welfare Island' (Today Tonight 2012).
Escrito dos meses antes de morir, desde un hospital en lo que hoy se conoce como Roosevelt Island, "The Sun in Welfare Island" ocupa un lugar incomodo en el corpus poetico de la escritora.
Before the FDR rebranding, it was known for decades as Welfare Island, a legacy of its history as the place where the city sent all its undesirables.
As Smith approached at 500 feet, he apparently mistook Welfare Island in the East River for Manhattan, and as the plane crossed it, he adjusted his course accordingly to head for Newark Field.
The Roosevelt Island Bridge was built in 1952, and originally called the Welfare Island Bridge when it opened in 1955.
This NYU laboratory was located on Welfare Island in the middle of the East River and focused on antimalarial drugs.
Upon being sentenced to eight days on Welfare Island, West quipped, "I expect it will be the malting of me." The rest, as they say, is her story.
In 1942, as part of their Christmas tradition, the students of The Metropolitan Hospital School of Nursing gathered to sing Christmas carols in the hospital's Octagon Tower, one of New York's most significant architectural landmarks, located on the north end of what at the time was called Welfare Island.
In 1921, the island was renamed Welfare Island to reflect its role as a repository for the ill and outcast.
In the early 1800's, the City of New York purchased what became known as Welfare Island in 1921 because of the numerous community facilities such as hospitals, mental homes and the prison, where Mae West was jailed for 10 days in 1934 after performing in her show called "Sex."