corporate welfare

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corporate welfare

n.
Financial aid, such as a subsidy or tax break, provided by a government to corporations or other businesses, especially when viewed as wasteful or unjust: "critics who say that letting big companies raise private stock on public land amounts to corporate welfare" (Frank Clifford).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cor′porate wel′fare


n.
financial assistance, as tax breaks or subsidies, given by the government esp. to large companies.
[1990–95, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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It also makes political and moral sense to cut welfare for the rich before cutting welfare for the poor.
He says he spent that $160 million on "economic development." The Hard Rock Cafe concert series, the Holiday Market debacle, the welfare for the rich handouts to cheap touts like Mark Hamister for his pie in the sky little box hotel downtown, the new train station and the North Main Street courthouse ...
The unacceptable something-for-nothing culture in Britain is welfare for the rich, including the 5p tax cuts for an elite wealthy beyond the dreams of avarice.
EVERY time think tanks such as Policy Exchange dream up more ways of getting their client's itchy fingers on public assets, the more they reveal their love of welfare for the rich.
It's welfare for the rich. It's the government picking winners and losers.
Browning doesn't expressly make this point, but the existence of welfare for the poor provides the smokescreen for welfare for the rich. Like a magician misdirecting the attention of his audience, politicians made a big spectacle of their proclaimed "compassion" for the poor while slyly slipping billions to well-heeled interest groups.
Why is there public money to provide welfare for the rich but not the poor?
If we want to live up to the old saw that the press should "comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable," the TV cameras need to spend more time focused on the ugly realities of welfare for the rich.
It is going to take a movement made up of unions, community groups and aware citizens demanding a more progressive tax system, less emphasis on militarism and an end to welfare for the rich and the corporations.
Consider some recent examples of TV's welfare for the rich:
As welfare for the rich, this bailout--coming at the very moment when Congress is tightening bankruptcy rules for ordinary citizens--far exceeds the legendary government rescue of Chrysler a generation ago, which at least could be seen as a kind of lemon socialism that saved jobs and produced cars.
But it's welfare for the rich. As for the poor, they are seemingly expendable.

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