welfare state

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Related to Welfare theory: Welfare economics

welfare state

n.
1. A social system whereby the state assumes primary responsibility for the welfare of its citizens, as in matters of health care, education, employment, and social security.
2. A nation in which such a system operates.

welfare state

n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a system in which the government undertakes the chief responsibility for providing for the social and economic security of its population, usually through unemployment insurance, old-age pensions, and other social-security measures
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a social system characterized by such policies

wel′fare state`


n.
a state in which the welfare of the people in such matters as social security, health and education, housing, and working conditions is the responsibility of the government.
[1940–45]

welfare state

A social system in which the state takes responsibility for the social and economic wellbeing of its citizens, especially in matters of health and social security.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.welfare state - a government that undertakes responsibility for the welfare of its citizens through programs in public health and public housing and pensions and unemployment compensation etc.
state - the group of people comprising the government of a sovereign state; "the state has lowered its income tax"
Translations
دَوْلَة رَفاه إجْتِماعي
velfærdsstat
jóléti állam
velferîarríki
sociálny štát
refah toplumu

welfare state

n the welfare statelo stato sociale

welfare

(ˈwelfeə) noun
1. mental and physical health; living conditions. Who is looking after the child's welfare?
2. money or aid given by government to people in need. He is on welfare; She lives on welfare; to get welfare.
ˈchild welfare noun
1. aid provided to dependent children.
2. concern for the living conditions etc of children. She has a job as a child welfare officer.
welfare state
a country which runs insurance schemes for its inhabitants, supplying them with free medical care, pensions etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This distinction is fraught with implications for welfare economics and the contemporary analysis of public policy even if it was not so significant at the time the welfare theory of natural liberty took shape.
Roth begins with the modern economist's embrace of a theory of the state in which a social welfare theory drives policymaking based on utilitarian considerations This process results in distributive rather than procedural justice As a result, the "egalitarian spirit" destroys rights and imposes discriminatory policies and redistributionism This in turn impacts the individual citizen's psyche, their respect for law and rights, and reduces their trust in government The author thereby blames modern economics, or at least the acceptance of its analytical and moral framework, for undermining "the legitimacy and stability of republican self government.
of Nottingham, UK) argues that there is such a thing as "welfare theory," distinct from social and political theory, that can be considered the "philosophy of social policy," and in this introductory-level text maps out the historical origins, key concepts, influential debates, and recent developments in welfare theory.
In the book's first chapter, Carol Steiker offers a lucid and thought-provoking essay on the relationship between mercy and overcriminalization, arguing that the dominant discourse between retributivist and social welfare theory ineluctably tends towards overpunishment.
Since Smith's writings, the discipline of economics has constructed a body of work called welfare theory.
Many libertarians, as well as other free-market advocates, have extreme reservations about the welfare theory of neoclassical economics.
Hicksian welfare theory, which is static in nature, forms the basis of modern welfare analysis.
This, in turn, animates a conservative theory of law, and implies a rejection of utilitarian social welfare theory, and its antecedent, received neoclassical economic theory.
Today, looking at the principles and intermediate texts, which (since welfare economics is no longer actively taught in undergraduate or graduate school) are as close to welfare theory as most economists get today, one gets no inkling that applied policy is muddling through.
While most previous accounts of social policy or welfare theory, as it is also known, are organized around major theoretical schools of thought, and examine the implications of these schools of thought for social policy, these two book approach the subject from the perspective of key concepts.
Second, the culture of welfare theory argues that welfare recipients were socialized in a culture with deviant values, such as lack of work ethic and welfare dependency during childhood.