Welland Canal


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Welland Canal

(ˈwɛlənd)
n
(Placename) a canal in S Canada, in Ontario, linking Lake Erie to Lake Ontario: part of the St Lawrence Seaway, with eight locks. Length: 44 km (28 miles). Also called: Welland Ship Canal
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of Henderson's other famous projects include the Thousand Islands and Quebec Bridges over the Saint Lawrence River between New York and Ontario and the vertical lift bridges over the Welland Canal to connect Lakes Ontario and Erie in Ontario.
LARGE INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS such as the construction of the fourth Welland canal and power-generating stations drew thousands of immigrants to the region, as did the promise of steadier employment in manufacturing.
Then it examines the history of the Great Lakes from a human dimension, with the construction of the Erie Canal and Welland Canal, opening the doors to an ecosystem that had previously been isolated.
The closing date of the Welland Canal usually dictates how late the Port of Thunder Bay stays open.
Biking, with my 'Gears and Beers' friends around the Niagara Peninsula, September 2014, brought us past the resting place of my fifth-great-grandmother, Barbara Bender (1741-1821), in the Carl Misener Bald Loyalist Cemetery on the Welland Canal, at Port Robinson.
(Signed) REPRESENTATIVE OF GENERAL STAFF The Bureau of Investigation soon learned of von Papen's involvement in a plot to blow up the Welland Canal as well as one to hire Irish-Americans to sabotage American shipping.
Growing up in close proximity to the Welland Canal, Burtynsky became fascinated by the ability of societies to alter environments through technology--a theme that would later become the basis of his work.
ET1 Hasani Thomas stands the lookout watch aboard USS Freedom (LCS 1) as the ship transits the Canadian Welland Canal section of the St.
4) The Welland Canal connects Lake Ontario to which Great Lake?
That agitation would ultimately result in the unsuccessful, almost comical rebellion of 1837, but two years before he assured his place in the history books for his role leading the revolt, William Lyon Mackenzie published an obscure little newspaper called the Welland Canal that, as Rosner writes, told stories of "shady land transactions, stock manipulation, and practices that would send modern forensic accountants into a tizzy of excitement."
Then in the late 1990s, the venerable German firm Hapag-Lloyd built the Columbus, a 420-passenger shill designed to fit the exacting requirements of the Welland Canal locks, the tightest squeeze on the Great Lakes route.